Alice de Armenters , Heiress of Stowe & Burley1

F, b. circa 1248, d. after 1290
     Alice de Armenters , Heiress of Stowe & Burley was born circa 1248 at Stowe Nine Churches, Daventry, Northamptonshire, England. She married Gerard de Lisle , of Kingston Lisle before 1271.1 Alice de Armenters , Heiress of Stowe & Burley died after 1290.1
     She He [Gerard de Lisle] married, in or before 1271, Alice, daughter and heirof Henry DE ARMENTERS. He was living in June 1287, but died beforeNovember 1288. His widow was living in 1290. [Complete Peerage VIII:48(transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

Child of Alice de Armenters , Heiress of Stowe & Burley and Gerard de Lisle , of Kingston Lisle

Citations

  1. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VIII:48.

William Bourchier , Count of Eu, Sir1,2,3,4

M, b. circa 1374, d. 28 May 1420
     William Bourchier , Count of Eu, Sir was born circa 1374 at Little Easton, Essex, England.2 He married Anne Plantagenet , Countess of Buckingham, daughter of Thomas Plantagenet , KG, Duke of Gloucester and Eleanor (Alianore) de Bohun, before 20 November 1405.1,3 William Bourchier , Count of Eu, Sir died on 28 May 1420 at Troyes, Aube, Champagne, France.1,3
     He Sir William Bourg(h)chier, Count of Eu, in Normandy, so created 10 June1419 (one of six Comtes in Normandy created by Henry V within a period ofa single year to cement his power in France following the victory ofAgincourt); b. c 1374; m. c 20 Nov 1405, as her 3rd husband, Anne,Countess of Buckingham, Hereford and Northampton, widow of 3rd and 5thEarls of Stafford, and daughter of Thomas of Woodstock, Duke ofGloucester (6th son of Edward III), and sister and eventually sole heirof her brother Humphrey, Earl of Buckingham, and d. 28 May 1420. [Burke'sPeerage]

Constable of Tower of London. [Ancestral Roots]

Sir William Bourchier, died Troyes 28 May 1420, Count of Eu. [MagnaCharta Sureties]

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.
  3. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 18-9.
  4. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/1:180-1.

Thomas Plantagenet , KG, Duke of Gloucester1,2

M, b. between 7 January 1354 and 1355, d. between 8 September 1397 and 9 September 1397
     Thomas Plantagenet , KG, Duke of Gloucester was buried at Westminster Abbey, London, Middlesex, England. He was born between 7 January 1354 and 1355 at Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England.1,2 He was the son of Edward III Plantagenet King of England and Philippa d' Avesnes , of Hainault. Thomas Plantagenet , KG, Duke of Gloucester married Eleanor (Alianore) de Bohun, daughter of Humphrey IX de Bohun , KG, Earl of Hereford and Joan FitzAlan, before 24 August 1376.1,2 Thomas Plantagenet , KG, Duke of Gloucester died between 8 September 1397 and 9 September 1397 at Prince's Inn, Calais, France; (imprisoned and murdered by King RIchard II.)1,2
     Thomas Plantagenet , KG, Duke of Gloucester was also known as Thomas of Woodstock , Duke of Gloucester. He Thomas Plantagenet, KG, of Woodstock, born 7 Jan 1354/5, died Calais, 8or 9 Sep 1397, Duke of Gloucester, son of King Edward III of England andPhillipa of Hainault. [Magna Charta Sureties]

--------------------------

EARLDOM OF ESSEX (XIII) 1380 to 1397

EARLDOM OF BUCKINGHAM (IV) 1377 to 1397

Thomas, surnamed 'of Woodstock,' Knight, K.G., sixth and youngest son ofEdward III, was summoned to Parliament on 1 Dec. 1376, and created Earlof BUCKINGHAM on 16 July 1377 at the Coronation of King Richard II whenhe acted as Constable, and Duke of Gloucester on 6 Aug. 1385. He was Earlof Essex jure uxoris, but not of Hereford or Northampton, and wasrecognised as Constable of England jure uxoris. He was active in theFrench and Scottish wars, and was the leader of the opposition againstthe autocratic rule of his nephew King Richard II. After ten years ofquarrelling with Richard, he was said to have conspired to imprison theKing. THOMAS OF GLOUCESTER, Duke of Gloucester, was arrested at Pleshey,taken to Calais where he was murdered by suffocation, it is said in ahouse called the Prince's Inn, on 8 or 15 Sep. 1397 according to theconfessions of his murderers, and was buried at Westminster Abbey. Hiswidow died testate at Minoresses Convent in Aldgate 3 Oct. 1399, and wasburied at Westminster Abbey. [Complete Peerage II:388, (transcribed byDave Utzinger)]

--------------------------

Along with 4 other ruthless Barons, John of Gaunt (regent during KingRichard II's minority), Richard FitzAlan Earl of Arundel, Thomas deBeauchamp Earl of Warwick, and Thomas Mowbray Duke of Norfolk, becameknown as the 'Apellants'. They had real power during much of KingRichard II's reign and had many of his friends executed to keep himpowerless.

In 1397 Richard had gathered a party of supporters and finally struckback. Arundel was executed, Warwick was banished, and Thomas ofWoodstock, Duke of Gloucester was imprisoned and murdered. In 1398 HenryBolingbroke, son of John of Gaunt (dead) was deprived of all of hisLancastrian estates and banished as well. However in 1399 Henry invadedEngland while Richard was in Ireland and became Henry IV.

[information taken from Encylcopedia Britannica]

---------------------------

Thomas of Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester, (b. Jan. 7, 1355, Woodstock,Oxfordshire, Eng.--d. probably September 1397), powerful opponent of KingRichard II of England (ruled 1377-99).

The seventh son of King Edward III (ruled 1327-77), he was created Dukeof Gloucester in 1385 and soon became the leader of a party opposed toRichard II, his young nephew. In 1386 Gloucester and hisassociates--later known as the appellants--took virtual control of theking's government. Gloucester defeated one of Richard's favourites,Robert de Vere, Duke of Ireland, at Radcot Bridge, London, in December1387 and then had a number of the king's friends executed. In 1389Richard gained the upper hand and worked out a compromise with hisenemies. Gloucester was made lieutenant of Ireland in 1392, but in 1397Richard arrested him and two other leading appellants. Committed to thecharge of Thomas Mowbray, Earl of Nottingham (later Duke of Norfolk), atthe English port of Calais, France, Gloucester was murdered, possibly onorders from Richard. According to one of Mowbray's servants, who waslater executed for his part in the crime, the duke was suffocated with afeather bed. [Encyclopædia Britannica CD '97]

Child of Thomas Plantagenet , KG, Duke of Gloucester and Eleanor (Alianore) de Bohun

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 18-8.

Eleanor (Alianore) de Bohun1,2

F, b. 1366, d. 3 October 1399
     Eleanor (Alianore) de Bohun was buried at Westminster Abbey, London, Middlesex, England. She was born in 1366 at Peterborough Castle, Northamptonshire, England. She was the daughter of Humphrey IX de Bohun , KG, Earl of Hereford and Joan FitzAlan. Eleanor (Alianore) de Bohun married Thomas Plantagenet , KG, Duke of Gloucester, son of Edward III Plantagenet King of England and Philippa d' Avesnes , of Hainault, before 24 August 1376.1,2 Eleanor (Alianore) de Bohun died on 3 October 1399 at Aldgate, London, Middlesex, England.1,2
     She Alianore de Bohun, died 3 Oct 1399; married apparently before 24 Aug1376, Thomas Plantagenet, KG, of Woodstock, born 7 Jan 1354/5, diedCalais, 8 or 9 Sep 1397, Duke of Gloucester, son of King Edward III ofEngland and Phillipa of Hainault. [Magna Charta Sureties]

Child of Eleanor (Alianore) de Bohun and Thomas Plantagenet , KG, Duke of Gloucester

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 18-8.

Humphrey IX de Bohun , KG, Earl of Hereford1,2,3,4

M, b. 25 March 1342, d. between 16 January 1372 and 1373
     Humphrey IX de Bohun , KG, Earl of Hereford was buried at Walden Abbey, Saffron Walden, Essex, England. He was born on 25 March 1342 at Huntington Castle, Kington, Herefordshire, England.3,4 He was the son of William de Bohun , 1st Earl of Northampton, KG and Elizabeth de Badlesmere. Humphrey IX de Bohun , KG, Earl of Hereford married Joan FitzAlan, daughter of Richard 'Copped Hat' FitzAlan , 10th Earl Arundel and Eleanor Plantagenet, after 9 September 1359.2,3,4 Humphrey IX de Bohun , KG, Earl of Hereford died between 16 January 1372 and 1373 at Pleshey Castle, Chelmsford, Essex, England.3,4
     He Humphrey de Bohun IX, KG, born 25 Mar 1342, died 16 Jan 1372/3, Earl ofHereford, Essex, and Northampton; married after 9 Sep 1359, Joan FitzAlan, died 7 April 1419, daughter of Richard Fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel,and Eleanor Plantagenet, daughter of Henry Plantagenet, Earl of Lancaster(son of Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, son of Henry III), and Maud deChaworth. [Magna Charta Sureties]

----------------------------------------

EARLDOM OF ESSEX (XII) 1361

EARLDOM OF NORTHAMPTON (VII, 2) 1360

EARLDOM OF HEREFORD (XI, 7) 1361

HUMPHREY (DE BOHUN), EARL OF HEREFORD AND ESSEX, EARL OF NORTHAMPTON, andConstable of England, nephew and heir, being son and heir of William (DEBOHUN), EARL OF NORTHAMPTON, and Elizabeth his wife, was born 25 March1342, succeeded his father as Earl of Northampton 16 September 1360, andhis uncle, as Earl of Hereford and Essex and Constable of England, 15October 1361. On 26 January 1362/3 Richard, Earl of Arundel, and otherswere appointed his guardians in England, Wales and Ireland while he wasgoing on a pilgrimage beyond the seas in his nonage. He was present atthe confirmation of the treaty between Edward III and Pedro, King ofCastile and Leon, 1 February 1362/3. The King took his homage 5 May 1363,and he had restoration of his father's lands. He was nominated K.G. about1365. On 18 July 1366 he was going beyond seas on the King's service, andon 28 November 1367 was again beyond seas, serving on various embassies.He was with John, Duke of Lancaster in France.

He married, after 9 September 1359, Joan, daughter of Richard (FITZALAN),EARL OF ARUNDEL, by his 2nd wife, Eleanor, widow of John (DE BEAUMONT),LORD BEAUMONT, and daughter of Henry, EARL OF LANCASTFR. He died s.p.m.,16 January 1372/3, and his lands were taken into the King's hand 17 and18 January 1372/3. He was buried in Walden Abbey, at the feet of hisfather, on the north side of the presbytery. His will as Earl of Herefordand Essex and of Northampton and Constable of England is dated at Pleshey12 December 1372, and was proved 15 May 1373 at Lambeth. His widow hadassignment of dower 26 July 1373. She, who was a great benefactress toWalden Abbey, died 7 April 1419, and was also bur. there. [CompletePeerage VI:473-4, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

His coheirs were his 2 daughters, Eleanor de Bohun, who was aged 7 at herfather's death, and Mary de Bohun, returned as aged 3 or 4.

(1) Eleanor de Bohun m. Thomas surnamed of Woodstock, youngest son ofEdward III, who was created Earl of Buckingham in 1377 and Duke ofGloucester in 1385. He was, in right of his wife, recognised asConstable of England, and in writs of summons was so addressed. He alsoseems to have been recognised as Earl of Essex, having a grant of the feeof that earldom 13 Apr. 1374.
(2) Mary de Bohun married Henry, Earl of Derby, created Duke of Hereford,who ascended the throne in 1399 as Henry IV.

----------------------------------------

Humphrey de Bohun, nephew of Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford andEarl of Essex, then being a minor at the decease of his uncle, and underthe guardianship of Richard, Earl of Arundel. His lordship did not,however, long enjoy this great accumulation of wealth and honour, for hed. in 1372 in the thirty-second year of his age, leaving by his wife,Joane, dau. of his late guardian, the Earl of Arundel, two daus., hisco-heirs, viz, Alianore, m. to Thomas of Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester,6th son of King Edward III; and Mary, m. to Henry, Earl of Derby (son ofJohn of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster), who afterwards ascended the throne asHenry IV.

Upon the decease of this nobleman, the Earldom of Hereford expired, buthis son-in-law, the Earl of Derby, was subsequently created (in 1397)Duke of Hereford, prior, of course, to his becoming King of England,while the lordships of Essex and Northampton and the constableship fellto his other son-in-law, the Duke of Gloucester, and the Earldoms ofEssex and Northampton became extinct. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant andExtinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, London, 1883, p. 57, Bohun, Earls ofHereford, Earls of Essex, Earls of Northampton, and High Constables ofEngland]

Child of Humphrey IX de Bohun , KG, Earl of Hereford and Joan FitzAlan

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.
  3. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 18-7.
  4. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VI:473-4.

Joan FitzAlan1,2,3

F, b. circa 1345, d. 7 April 1419
     Joan FitzAlan was buried at Walden Abbey, Saffron Walden, Essex, England. She was born circa 1345 at Arundel, Essex, England. She was the daughter of Richard 'Copped Hat' FitzAlan , 10th Earl Arundel and Eleanor Plantagenet. Joan FitzAlan married Humphrey IX de Bohun , KG, Earl of Hereford, son of William de Bohun , 1st Earl of Northampton, KG and Elizabeth de Badlesmere, after 9 September 1359.4,2,3 Joan FitzAlan died on 7 April 1419 at Quendon, Saffron Walden, Essex, England.2,3
     She Joan Fitz Alan, died 7 April 1419, daughter of Richard Fitz Alan, Earl ofArundel, and Eleanor Plantagenet, daughter of Henry Plantagenet, Earl ofLancaster (son of Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, son of Henry III), and Maudde Chaworth. [Magna Charta Sureties]

------------------

He [Humphrey de Bohun] married, after 9 September 1359, Joan, daughter ofRichard (FITZALAN), EARL OF ARUNDEL, by his 2nd wife, Eleanor, widow ofJohn (DE BEAUMONT), LORD BEAUMONT, and daughter of Henry, EARL OFLANCASTFR. He died s.p.m., 16 January 1372/3, and his lands were takeninto the King's hand 17 and 18 January 1372/3. He was buried in WaldenAbbey, at the feet of his father, on the north side of the presbytery.His will as Earl of Hereford and Essex and of Northampton and Constableof England is dated at Pleshey 12 December 1372, and was proved 15 May1373 at Lambeth. His widow had assignment of dower 26 July 1373. She, whowas a great benefactress to Walden Abbey, died 7 April 1419, and was alsobur. there. [Complete Peerage VI:473-4, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

Child of Joan FitzAlan and Humphrey IX de Bohun , KG, Earl of Hereford

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 18-7.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VI:473-4.
  4. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.

Thomas de Stafford , 3rd Earl of Stafford1,2,3

M, b. before 1368, d. 4 July 1392
     Thomas de Stafford , 3rd Earl of Stafford was buried at Stone Priory, Staffordshire, England. He was born before 1368 at Stafford, Staffordshire, England.2,3 He was the son of Hugh Stafford , 2nd Earl of Stafford, KG, Sir and Philippa de Beauchamp. Thomas de Stafford , 3rd Earl of Stafford married Anne Plantagenet , Countess of Buckingham, daughter of Thomas Plantagenet , KG, Duke of Gloucester and Eleanor (Alianore) de Bohun, in 1392.1 Thomas de Stafford , 3rd Earl of Stafford died on 4 July 1392 at Westminster, London, Middlesex, England.2,3
     Thomas de Stafford , 3rd Earl of Stafford was also known as 3rd Earl of Stafford , Thomas Stafford. He Thomas de Stafford, 3rd Earl of Stafford [Ralph, the eldest brother wasmurdered May 1385 by Sir John de Holland, Richard II's half brother andlater 1st and last Duke of Exeter of the 1397 creation, to avenge thekilling by one of Ralph's retainers of his favorite Esquire]; born by1368; knighted 1390; married Anne (married 2nd her brother-in-law, 5thEarl; married 3rd Sir William Bourchier, Count of Eu, and died 16 Oct1438), daughter and ultimately sole heir of Thomas of Woodstock, 1st andlast Earl of Buckingham of the 1377 creation and 1st Duke of Gloucesterof the 1385 creation (6th son of Edward III), and dsp 4 July 1392.[Burke's Peerage]

--------------------------

BARONY OF STAFFORD (IV) 1386

EARLDOM OF STAFFORD (III) 1386

THOMAS (DE STAFFORD), EARL OF STAFFORD, &c., 2nd but 1st survived son andheir, born in or before 1368. On 24 November 1389 he was, as a minor,retained to stay with the King for life. Knighted 23 April 1390. On 20October 1390 he had proved his age and done homage; on 10 December 1391,as 'the King's kinsman' he was pardoned reliefs.

He married Anne, daughter and eventually sole heir of Thomas (OFWOODSTOCK), DUKE OF GLOUCESTER (6th son of EDWARD III), by Eleanor, elderdaughter and coheir of Humphrey (DE BOHUN), 7th EARL OF HEREFORD, 6thEARL OF ESSEX and 2nd EARL OF NORTHAMPTON. He died 4 July 1392 atWestminster, and was buried next his father at Stone. His widow married,2ndly, his brother Edmund, 5th EARL OF STAFFORD. [Complete PeerageXII/1:179-80, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/1:179-80.

Richard Neville , KG, Earl of Salisbury1,2

M, b. 1400, d. 31 December 1460
     Richard Neville , KG, Earl of Salisbury married Alice Montagu, daughter of Thomas of Salisbury de Montacute and Alianore Holand, Bef Feb 1420/21 at of, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.3 Richard Neville , KG, Earl of Salisbury was born in 1400 at Castle Raby, Durham, England.4,2 He was the son of Ralph de Neville KG, 1st Earl Westmorland and Joan Swynford de Beaufort. Richard Neville , KG, Earl of Salisbury died on 31 December 1460 at Beheaded at Pontefract, Yorkshire, England.1,2 He was buried on 15 January 1461 at Bisham Priory, Maidenhead, Berkshire, England.

Child of Richard Neville , KG, Earl of Salisbury and Alice Montagu

Citations

  1. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 94-10.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XI:395-8.
  3. [S232] Unknown author, 6 zip files containing Monarchs.ged downloaded end 1999 by Linda Neely.
  4. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.

Thomas de Holand 2nd Earl of Kent, KG, Sir1,2,3,4

M, b. circa 1350, d. 25 April 1397
     Thomas de Holand 2nd Earl of Kent, KG, Sir was buried at Abbey of Bourne, Lincolnshire, England. He was born circa 1350 at Broughton, Newport Pagnell, Buckinghamshire, England.1,4 He was the son of Thomas de Holand , KG, 1st Earl of Kent and Joan Plantagenet , 'The Fair Maid of Kent'. Thomas de Holand 2nd Earl of Kent, KG, Sir married Alice FitzAlan, daughter of Richard 'Copped Hat' FitzAlan , 10th Earl Arundel and Eleanor Plantagenet, after 10 April 1364 at Arundel, Sussex, England.1,4 Thomas de Holand 2nd Earl of Kent, KG, Sir died on 25 April 1397 at Woodstock Palace, Oxfordshire, England.1,4
     He Thomas de Holand, 2nd/5th Earl of Kent and 6th Lord (Baron) Wake, KG(1376); knighted 1367, Marshal of England March 1379/80-85; married alittle while after 10 April 1364 Alice, daughter of 10th/3rd Earl ofArundel, and died 25 April 1397. [Burke's Peerage]

-----------------------------------------

Sir Thomas de Holand, KG, of Woodstock, age 9+ or 10+ at father's death,d. 25 Apr 1397, 2nd Earl of Kent; m. shortly aft. 10 Apr 1364 Alice FitzAlan, d. 17 Mar 1415/6, daughter of Sir Richard Fitz Alan and EleanorPlantagenet. [Magna Charta Sureties]

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BARONY OF WAKE (VI) 1360

EARLDOM OF KENT (VII, 2) 1360

THOMAS (DE HOLAND), EARL OF KENT, LORD WOODSTOCK, HOLAND and WAKE, sonand heir, aged 9 and more or 10 and more at his father's death. He wasknighted by the Prince of Wales at Vittoria in March 1367, and fought atthe battle of Najera, 3 April following. On 24 July 1371 at Plymouth hegranted to his companion in arms, Sir Richard Waldegrave, and his heirsmale, leave to bear his helm-- 'party per pale argent and gules, crownedor.' He accompanied the Duke of Brittany in his expedition to Brittany inMarch 1374/5. Nominated K.G. between April 1375 and April 1376. On 2lJuly I377 he was appointed Keeper of the forest South of Trent, duringpleasure, and on 12 April 1378 he was granted £200 per annum to supporthis rank and in lieu of any fee as Keeper; on 13 March 1379/80 this wasaltered to rents worth £796 13s. 4d., to hold as from 21 February lastuntil he had his inheritance. On 22 October 1378 he was appointed aCommissioner to treat with Scotland concerning breaches of the peace. Inthe same year be served in the fleet in the Channel during a projectedinvasion of France. On 13 March 1379/80 he was appointed Marshal ofEngland, which office he held till 30 June 1385. As 'Thomas, Earl ofKent,' he had letters of protection 5 June 1380. On 26 December 1380 hewas appointed an Ambassador to treat concerning the King's marriage toAnne, sister of Wenceslaus, King of the Romans and of Bohemia, anddaughter of the deceased Emperor Charles. He was summoned for MilitaryService against the Scots 13 June 1385, and to Parliament from 16 July1380 to 18 July 1397, by writs directed Thome de Holand' comiti Kanc'. On2 October 1383 he was appointed Keeper of the King's forest and Master ofthe game, South of Trent, and was granted the custody of the New Forestand the castle and town of Southampton, for life. On 20 November 1384 hewas granted the custody of the castle and town of Cherbourg. In 1385 heaccompanied the King on his expedition to Scotland. On 25 September 1385the king took his homage and fealty, and gave him livery of his mother'slands, although all the inquisitions taken after her death had not yetbeen returned into Chancery. On 10 November 1385 he was sent to Calais tosee that the town was in a proper state of defence. On 10 August 1386 hewas granted, for life, the manor of Brockenhurst, Hants, as from thedeath of Edward Ill. On 9 May 1387 he was granted the custody of theTower of London, for life. He was appointed a Commissioner, 17 May andagain 20 June 1389, to hear the appeal of Sir Robert Grosvenor againstthe judgment which had been pronounced in his suit with Sir Richard leScrope. On 1 May 1391 the office of Constable of Corfe Castle was grantedto him and Alice his wife, in survivorsllip. In 1394 he and his sonThomas accompanied the King to Ireland.

He married, shortly after 10 April 1364, Alice, daughter of Richard, Earlof Arundel, by Eleanor, daughter of Henry, Earl of Lancaster. he died 25April 1397, and was buried in the Abbey of Bourne, co. Lincoln. She died17 March 1415/6. [Complete Peerage VII:154-6, (transcribed by DaveUtzinger)] He was Earl of Kent.

Children of Thomas de Holand 2nd Earl of Kent, KG, Sir and Alice FitzAlan

Citations

  1. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 90-8.
  2. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/2:899, II:494.
  4. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VII:154-6.

Alice FitzAlan1,2,3,4

F, b. circa 1350, d. between 17 March 1415 and 1416
     Alice FitzAlan was born circa 1350 at Arundel, Essex, England. She was the daughter of Richard 'Copped Hat' FitzAlan , 10th Earl Arundel and Eleanor Plantagenet. Alice FitzAlan married Thomas de Holand 2nd Earl of Kent, KG, Sir, son of Thomas de Holand , KG, 1st Earl of Kent and Joan Plantagenet , 'The Fair Maid of Kent', after 10 April 1364 at Arundel, Sussex, England.1,4 Alice FitzAlan died between 17 March 1415 and 1416.1,4
     Alice FitzAlan was also known as Alice Fitzalan Countess of Kent. Alice FitzAlan was also known as Alice Holand. She Alice, daughter of 10th/3rd Earl of Arundel. [Burke's Peerage]

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Alice Fitz Alan, d. 17 Mar 1415/6, daughter of Sir Richard Fitz Alan andEleanor Plantagenet. [Magna Charta Sureties]

---------------------------

He [Thomas de Holand] married, shortly after 10 April 1364, Alice,daughter of Richard, Earl of Arundel, by Eleanor, daughter of Henry, Earlof Lancaster. he died 25 April 1397, and was buried in the Abbey ofBourne, co. Lincoln. She died 17 March 1415/6. [Complete PeerageVII:154-6, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

Children of Alice FitzAlan and Thomas de Holand 2nd Earl of Kent, KG, Sir

Citations

  1. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 90-8.
  2. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/2:899.
  4. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VII:154-6.

Thomas de Holand , KG, 1st Earl of Kent1,2,3

M, b. 1314, d. BET 26 AND 28 DEC 1360
     Thomas de Holand , KG, 1st Earl of Kent died BET 26 AND 28 DEC 1360 at Normandy, France.1,2,3 He was buried at Church of Grey Friars, Stamford, Lincolnshire, England. He was born in 1314 at Broughton, Newport Pagnell, Buckinghamshire, England. He was the son of Robert III 1st Baron de Holand KG, Sir and Maud la Zouche , Heiress of Brackley. Thomas de Holand , KG, 1st Earl of Kent married Joan Plantagenet , 'The Fair Maid of Kent', daughter of Edmund of Woodstock Plantagenet 1st Earl of Kent and Margaret of Liddell Wake Baroness Wake, circa 1339.4,2,5
     Thomas de Holand , KG, 1st Earl of Kent Thomas de Holand, 1st Lord (Baron) Holand, so created March 1353/4 bywrit of summons to Parliament, KG (1348?, founding member); servedHundred Years War: Battle of Sluys (English naval victory) and Siege ofTournai 1340, Crecy 1346, Lt. and Capt. of Brittany and neighbouringparts of Poitou for duration of war March 1353/4, Keeper: Channel Islands1356, Crocy (Normandy) 1357 and Castle of Saint Sauveur le Vicomte Feb1358/9, Jt Lt. and Capt. of Duchy of Normandy 1359, Capt. and Lt. ofFrance and Normandy 1360; m. by 1339, as her 2nd of three husbands, Joan('The Fair Maid of Kent'), Countess of Kent in her own right andgranddaughter of Edward I, and in consequence was summoned to Parliament20 Nov 1360 as Earl of Kent, although the Parliament in question did notmeet till 24 Jan 1360/1, by which time he had d. 26 or 28 Dec 1360.[Burke's Peerage, p. 3100]

------------------------

Sir Thomas de Holand, KG, of Broughton, Bucks, considered to be Earl ofKent in right of his wife. [Burke's Peerage, p. 2904]

------------------------

Sir Thomas de Holand, KG, Earl of Kent, d. Normandy 26 or 28 Dec 1360; m.in or bef. 1339 Joan Plantagenet, Countess of Kent, the 'Fair Maid ofKent', d. Wallingford Castle 8 Aug 1385. [Magna Charta Sureties, line90-7]

------------------------

EARLDOM OF KENT (VI, 1) 1352

JOAN, suo jure COUNTESS OF KENT, BARONESS WOODSTOCK and BARONESS WAKE,sister and heir, aged 24 and more at her brother's death. She hadmarried, in spring 1340, Sir Thomas DE HOLAND, K.G., of Broughton, Bucks,younger son of Sir Robert DE HOLAND, of Upholland, co. Lancs, by Maud,2nd daughter and coheir of Sir Alan LA ZOUCHE, of Ashby, co. Leicester[LORD ZOUCHE]. In 1337 he had served under Robert d'Artois in anexpedition to Bordeaux, and also took part in an embassy sent to theCount of Hainault at Valenciennes. In 134o he was in the expedition toFlanders, taking part in the battle of Sluys, 24 June, and siege ofTournai in July. On 6 January 1340/1 he had a protection going acrossseas with the King, in 1341 was sent with John d'Artevelt and a force toBayonne to guard the frontier, and in 1342 accompanied Robert d'Artois toBrittany in support of the Countess de Montfort. On 2 May 1343 and 12June 1346 he was about to go beyond seas. In 1343 he was one of thecommanders left to besiege Nantes, when the King-himself withdrew, and hetook part also in the assault on Vannes. On 28 June 1346 his mother hadlicence to enfeoff him of the manors of Halse, Brackley, and King'sSutton. He took the Count of Eu prisoner at the capture of Caen, 26 July1346,[g] but surrendered him to Edward III for 80,000 florins with theshield, 16 June 1347. He fought at Crécy, 26 August 1346, in the Prince'sdivision, and after the battle superintended the counting of the slain.Before 10 February 1340/1, during his absence abroad, Joan his wife wentthrough a form of marriage (possibly under compulsion) with William(MONTAGU), EARL of SALISBURY.[j] On 14 May 1347 he was ordered to jointhe King before Calais and on 24 October following the King granted him£40 for his good services. On 24 August 1352 he and Joan his wife had agrant of 100 marks p.a. for Joan's life, or, if her brother died withoutissue, until she acquired his lands. On 22 February 1352/3 they hadlivery of the lands of her brother John, the King having taken the homageand fealty of Thornas. On 18 March 1353/4 he was appointed Lieutenant andCaptain in the duchy of Brittany and the parts of Poitou adjacent as longas the war with France should last, being reappointed 8 February 1354/5,as from 13 April next, for a year. In 1356 he and Joan his wife conveyedthe manors of Chesterfield and Ashford, with the advowson of the hospitalof St. Leonard of Chesterfield, to Otes de Holand chr., for life. On 6June 1356 he was appointed Keeper of the Channel Islands as from 2 Aprillast; on 18 November 1357 Keeper of the fortalice and place of Crocy(Cruyk), near Falaise, in Normandy; and on 5 February 1358/9 Keeper ofthe castle and fortress of Saint Sauveur le Vicomte at a rent of 5,000florins with the shield, which he was ordered, 12 May 1360, to deliver toSir John Chaundos. On 28 October 1359 he was appointed joint Lieutenantand Captain (with Philip of Navarre, Count of Longueville) in the duchyof Normandy, and on 30 September 1360 Captain and Lieutenant in Franceand Normandy for a quarter of a year, to have with him 60 men-at-arms(including one banneret and 10 knights) and 120 horse-archers. He wassummoned to a Council 15 July 1353, and to Parliament from 15 March1353/4 to 15 December 1357, by writs directed Thome de Holand', wherebyhe is held to have become LORD HOLAND. He was also summoned, inconsequence of bis marriage, 2o November 1360, by writ directed ThomeComiti Kanc', to the Parliament which met (a month after he died) 24January 1360/1. He, who was a founder Knight of the Order of the Garterdied in Normandy, 26 or 28 December 1360, and was buried in the Church ofthe Grey Friars at Stamford. On 20 February 1360/1 his widow had liveryof her lands which had been taken into the King's hand on the Earl'sdeath. She married, 2ndly, by dispensation, Sunday 10 October 1361, atWindsor, Edward, PRINCE OF WALES, who died 8 July 1376. She, who receivedRobes of the Order of the Garter in 1378, 1379, 1384 and 1385, was motherof Richard II. She died apparently 8 August 1385, at Wallingford Castle,Berks, and was buried in the Church of the Grey Friars at Stamford, co.Lincoln. [Complete Peerage VII:150-54, XIV:408, (transcribed by DaveUtzinger)]

[g] On this occasion Raoul, Count of Eu, Constable of France, and Jehande Melun, Count of Tankerville, Chamberlain of France, endeavoured tohold the gatehouse of the bridge, when the burghers had fled. Lookingout, they saw a group approaching, under a banner they recognised, amongthem a very gentle English knight, who had but one eye, called MessireThomas de Hollande. To him and his companions they surrendered. Then wasSir Thomas glad for two reasons, one that they were such good prisoners,for whom he could have 100,000 gold pieces, and the other that he hadsaved their lives, for they were in great danger between the French andEnglish. On entering the city the English knights did all they could toprotect the women of the town and the nuns. Thomas was one of thecommissioners to take the surrender. (Froissart, op. cit., vol. xvii, p.253).

[j] In Thomas de Holand's petition to Clement VI, May 1347, he says thathe was married to Joan more than 8 years ago, and that while he was inPrussia Montagu married her and unjustly detained her (Cal. PapalLetters, Vol. iii, p. 252). The matter was referred to Cardinal Ademar,who, after examination, reported the earlier marriage to be legal, andthe Pope thereupon, 17 Nov. 1349, ordered Joan to be restored to herlawful husband (Beltz, citing Reg. Islip, f. 18c-Lambeth Library). Thomas de Holand , KG, 1st Earl of Kent was also known as Thomas de Holland.

Child of Thomas de Holand , KG, 1st Earl of Kent and Joan Plantagenet , 'The Fair Maid of Kent'

Citations

  1. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 90-7.
  2. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VII:150-4.
  4. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 90-7, 114-6.
  5. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XI:388-90.

Margaret 2nd Baroness Wake1,2,3,4

F, b. circa 1299, d. 29 September 1349
     Margaret 2nd Baroness Wake was born circa 1299 at Liddel, Cumberland, England.1,4 She was the daughter of John 1st Baron Wake , Sir. Margaret 2nd Baroness Wake was born before 20 August 1309.3 She married an unknown person before 1314.5,4,3 She married Edmund of Woodstock Plantagenet 1st Earl of Kent, son of Edward I 'Longshanks' Hammer of the Scots Plantagenet and Marguerite le Hardi Princess of France, circa 25 December 1325.1,3,4 Margaret 2nd Baroness Wake died on 29 September 1349 at Liddel, Cumberland, England.1,3,4
     She Margaret Wake [brothers Thomas 2nd Baron Wake dsp 30/31 May 1349, Johnliving 1320 dsp], Baroness Wake in her own right; married 1st John Comynof Badenoch (dsp, killed at Battle of Bannockburn 13 June 1314), son of'The Red' Comyn, a claimant to the Scottish throne; married 2nd cChristmas 1325 Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent of the 1321 creation(beheaded for treason 19 March 1329/30), 6th and youngest son of EdwardI. [Burke's Peerage]

----------------------------

He [Edmund of Woodstock] had a dispensation, 6 October 1325, to marry,though she was related to him in the 3rd or 4th degree, and marry, aboutChristmas 1325, Margaret, widow of John Comyn, of Badenoch (who dieds.p., 24 June 1314, being slain at the battle of Bannockburn, sister andh. of Sir Tbomas WAKE, of Liddel, Cumberland [LORD WAKE], and daughter ofSir John WAKE, of the same [LORD WAKE], by Joan his wife. She was alloweddower out of her first husband's lands in October 1329. Certainletters-the treasonable character of which the Earl did notdeny----having come into the King's hands, he was arrested at theParliament of Winchester on the morrow of St. Gregory [13 March] 1329/30,when he confessed that he had sought to collect forces to restore EdwardII, having been persuaded that his half-brother was still alive. He wascondemned to death as a traitor by the award of the magnates in the saidParliament on the vigil of St. Cuthbert [19 March], and executed advesperas outside the gates of Winchester Castle. He was bur. in theChurch of the Friars Minor there, but his body was afterwards removed toWestminster Abbey. On 14 March his wife and children were sent toSalisbury Castle, to be in the custody of the sheriff of Wilts tillfurther orders. On her petition to Parliament on the morrow of St.Nicolas [7 December] 1330, the King, with the assent of Parl., allowedher to have her dower. The Earl's goods were restored to his executors 14February 1330/1, on 14, 15 February his widow had livery of her dower,and (20, 24 February) of the knights' fees and advowsons of her dower,all of which had been assigned to her by the King. On the death, s.p., ofher brother, Thomas, Lord Wake, 31 May 1349, she became, according tomodern doctrine, suo jure BARONESS WAKE. On 20 August 1349 the King tookher fealty and gave her livery of the lands of her brother, Thomas, LordWake, of Liddel, her homage being respited. She was then aged 40 andmore. She died 29 September 1349. [Complete Peerage VII:142-8,(transcribed by Dave Utzinger)] Margaret 2nd Baroness Wake was also known as Margaret 2nd Baroness Comyn.

Citations

  1. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 114-5.
  2. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VII:142-8.
  4. [S255] Unknown author, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists, by David Faris, 2nd Edition 1999, NEHGS, 185.
  5. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.

John 1st Baron Wake , Sir1,2,3,4,5,6

M, b. circa 1268, d. before 10 April 1300
     John 1st Baron Wake , Sir was born circa 1268 at Blisworth, Northamptonshire, England.1,3,4 He married Joan FitzBernard before 24 September 1291; Incorrectly Identified Wife.1,6,7 John 1st Baron Wake , Sir died before 10 April 1300 at Liddel, Cumberland, England.1,3,4
     He John Wake, 1st Lord (Baron), so created by writ of summons to Parliament24 June 1295; campaigned in Gascony between 1288 and 1297 and against theScots 1297-1300, Jt Captain of March of Scotland in Cumberland andWestmorland 1297, fought at Battle of Falkirk 1298; married by 24 Sep1291 Joan (died just prior to 26 Oct 1309), allegedly daughter of SirJohn FitzBernard, of Kingsdown, Kent or William de Fenes, a SpanishCount, and possibly a relative of Edward I, and died just prior to 10April 1300. [Burke's Peerage]

Note: I have put both Joan(s) in as wives of John. Only one (Joan deFiennes) was probably his wife. Ancestral Roots has a little moreexplicit (and different) information on 'Joan de Fenes', naming her Joande Fiennes, daughter of a non-Spanish, French/Englishman named William deFiennes by Blanche de Brienne. Douglas Richardson of SGM confirms thisidentity as daughter of William de Fiennes, Knt, seigneur of Fiennes andTingry (Pas-de-Calais/Artois, France), and in England, of Chokes andGayton, Northants and Wendover Bucks.

------------------------------------------

BARONY OF WAKE (I)

JOHN WAKE, son and heir, by 2nd wife, was born probably late in 1268. Hewas granted protection, 15 November 1288, to go to Gascony, was summonedfor service in Gascony, 1294, in company with the King's brother Edmund,and was summoned for service across the seas in 1297. In March 1293/4 hewas going to Scotland, where he was in 1296 and 1298, and he was summonedagainst the Scots, 1297-1300. He was summoned to Parliament from 24 June1295 to 29 December 1299, by writs directed Johanni Wake, whereby he isheld to have become LORD WAKE. He was Captain, with others, of the Marchof Scotland in Cumberland and Westmorland, 18 October 1297. He fought inthe 2nd line under the Bishop of Durham at the battle of Falkirk, 22 July1298; was a Commissioner to deal with Scottish prisoners, July 1299; andwas called to meet the Barons of the Exchequer at York, January1299/1300. He married, before 24 September 1291, Joan de Fiennes. He diedshortly before 10 April 1300. She died shortly before 26 October 1309.[Complete Peerage XII/2:301-2, XIV:623, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

Note: Apparently the preponderance of evidence identifies John's wife asJoan de Fiennes, daughter of William de Fiennes by Blanche de Brienne (asstated in AR line 236-10). This is based on an article in 'GenealogistMagazine' by John Carmi Parsons entitled 'Court and Household of Eleanorof Castile in 1290', (1977): 41, 44-46. Originally CP XII/2 named hiswife Joan with a note (c) that stated she may be a daughter of JohnFitzBernard or of William de Fenes, but this was corrected by volume XIVin favor of Joan de Fiennes as it now reads in the above text. . . .ALTHOUGH to confuse matters even more: Faris' Plantagenet Ancestry, 2ndEdition, page 185, indicates that Margaret Wake's parents were 'JohnWake, 1st Lord Wake, by Joan, daughter of John Fitz Bernard, Knt., ofKingsdown, Kent.' I have been told that the 1st edition of the book hadJoan de Fiennes as the mother, but the 2nd edition, published in 1999,appears to take a step backwards. Did they find out something new?

Child of John 1st Baron Wake , Sir

Citations

  1. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 114-4.
  2. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/2:301-2.
  4. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  5. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Douglas Richardson, 24 Jun 2003.
  6. [S255] Unknown author, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists, by David Faris, 2nd Edition 1999, NEHGS, 185.
  7. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/2:302 note (c).

Joan FitzBernard1,2,3,4

F, b. 1273, d. before 26 October 1309
     Joan FitzBernard was born in 1273 at Of Blisworth, Blisworth, Northamptonshire, England.5 She was born in 1273 at Kingsdown, Kent, England. She married John 1st Baron Wake , Sir before 24 September 1291; Incorrectly Identified Wife.1,3,4 Joan FitzBernard married John Lord Wake before 24 September 1291 at Of, Kingsdown, Kent, England.6 Joan FitzBernard died before 26 October 1309 at Blisworth, Northamptonshire, England.1 She died on 26 October 1309.5
     She Joan (died just prior to 26 Oct 1309), allegedly daughter of Sir JohnFitzBernard, of Kingsdown, Kent or William de Fenes, a Spanish Count, andpossibly a relative of Edward I. [Burke's Peerage]

Joan, perhaps dau of Sir John Fitz Barnard of Kingsdown, Kent. [MagnaCharta Sureties]

Note: Although I am keeping Joan FitzBernard as an alternate wife forhistorical reasons (based on the two above references), apparently thepreponderance of evidence identifies John's wife as Joan de Fiennes,daughter of William de Fiennes by Blanche de Brienne (as stated in ARline 236-10). Therefore Joan FitzBernard PROBABLY NEVER EXISTED. Thisis based on an article in 'Genealogist Magazine' by John Carmi Parsonsentitled 'Court and Household of Eleanor of Castile in 1290', (1977): 41,44-46. Originally CP XII/2 named his wife Joan with a note (c) thatstated she may be a daughter of John FitzBernard or of William de Fenes,but this was corrected by volume XIV in favor of Joan de Fiennes as itnow reads.

Below is a post to SGM by Douglas Richardson (sent to me in an e-mail byDouglas) which outlines the evidence for Joan de Fiennes:

Dear Newsgroup ~

In 1977, the historian, John Carmi Parsons, identified Joan, wife of JohnWake, 1st Lord Wake (died 1300) as the daughter of William de Fiennes,Knt., seigneur of Fiennes and Tingry (Pas-de-Calais), and, in England, ofChokes and Gayton, co. Northampton, Wendover, co. Buckingham, etc., byBlanche, daughter and heiress of Jean de Brienne [see J.C. Parsons, Courtand Household of Eleanor of Castile in 1290 (1977): 41, 44–46]. Thisparentage would make Joan a near kinswoman of King Edward II. Amongother evidence, Parsons noted that Joan was styled 'cousin' by Edward IIwhen he was still Prince of Wales [see H. Johnstone, Letters of EdwardPrince of Wales 1304–1305 (1931): 13].

For additional evidence that Joan, wife of John Wake, was truly aFiennes, it may be noted that Joan Wake's great-grandson, King Richard IIof England, referred to many descendants of Joan's sister, Margaret deFiennes, wife of Edmund de Mortimer, as his kinsfolk, among them beingThomas Beauchamp, William Beauchamp, Joan Burghersh, Elizabeth Burghersh,Edward Cherleton, and Thomas Clifford. While King Richard II shares acommon descent from King Edward I with Edward Cherleton, this is not thecase with the other individuals. Unless Joan Wake was a Fiennes, itwould be difficult to explain the kinship between King Richard II and theother individuals, especially the Beauchamp and Burghersh relations.These multiple references to Fiennes descended people as his kinsfolkprovides ample supporting evidence that King Richard II'sgreat-grandmother was a Fiennes. This is a good example of how the studyof references to the king's kinsmen can resolve longstanding genealogicalproblems.

Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

E-mail: royalancestry AT msn.com. Joan FitzBernard was also known as Joan* Fitz_bernard.

Child of Joan FitzBernard and John Lord Wake

Citations

  1. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 114-4.
  2. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.
  3. [S255] Unknown author, Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists, by David Faris, 2nd Edition 1999, NEHGS, 185.
  4. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/2:302 note (c).
  5. [S237] LAYNEJAYNE <, LAYNEJAYNE@@aol.com>, solidgold4 <, solidgold4@@aol.com>, jercty31 < and jercty31@@aol.com>, New England Families to Royalty GEDCOM inported 7 NOV 1999 by LindaJoyce Neely.
  6. [S232] Unknown author, 6 zip files containing Monarchs.ged downloaded end 1999 by Linda Neely.

Edward 'The Black' Plantagenet Prince of England1,2

M, b. 15 June 1330, d. 8 June 1376
     Edward 'The Black' Plantagenet Prince of England was born on 15 June 1330 at Woodstock Palace, Oxfordshire, England.2 He was the son of Edward III Plantagenet King of England and Philippa d' Avesnes , of Hainault. Edward 'The Black' Plantagenet Prince of England married Joan Plantagenet , 'The Fair Maid of Kent', daughter of Edmund of Woodstock Plantagenet 1st Earl of Kent and Margaret of Liddell Wake Baroness Wake, on 10 October 1361.1 Edward 'The Black' Plantagenet Prince of England died on 8 June 1376 at Westminster, Middlesex, England, at age 45.2
     Edward 'The Black' Plantagenet Prince of England was also known as 14th Earl of Chester , Edward of Woodstock.3 Edward 'The Black' Plantagenet Prince of England was also known as 1st Duke of Cornwall , Edward of Woodstock. He [Encyclopaedia Britannica CD, 1996, EDWARD, THE BLACK PRINCE]

Edward THE BLACK PRINCE, also called EDWARD OF WOODSTOCK, PRINCED'AQUITAINE, PRINCE OF WALES, DUKE OF CORNWALL, EARL OF CHESTER (b. June15, 1330, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, Eng.--d. June 8, 1376, Westminster,near London), son and heir apparent of Edward III of England and one ofthe outstanding commanders during the Hundred Years' War, winning hismajor victory at the Battle of Poitiers (1356). His sobriquet, said tohave come from his wearing black armour, has no contemporaryjustification and is found first in Richard Grafton's Chronicle ofEngland (1568).

Edward was created Earl of Chester (March 1333), Duke of Cornwall(February 1337)--the first appearance of this rank in England--and Princeof Wales (May 1343); he was Prince of Aquitaine from 1362 to 1372. Hisfirst campaign was served under his father in northern France (1346-47),and at the Battle of Crécy (Aug. 26, 1346) he won both his spurs and thefamous ostrich plumes and with them the mottoes used by himself andsubsequent princes of Wales, homout; ich dene ('Courage; I serve'; thewords are here spelled as Edward himself wrote them; later variantsinclude houmout and ich dien or ich diene). One of the original Knightsof the Garter, he was sent to France with independent command in 1355,winning his most famous victory over the French at Poitiers on Sept. 19,1356. The French king John II, brought captive to England, was treated bythe prince with a celebrated courtesy, but he was obligated to pay aransom of 3,000,000 gold crowns and to negotiate the treaties of Brétignyand Calais (1360) by which Aquitaine was ceded to the English.

Edward married his cousin Joan, the divorced and widowed Countess ofKent, in October 1361. He was created Prince of Aquitaine in July 1362and left England in 1363 to take up his duties. His powers and hisopportunities were great, but his rule was a failure, and he himself waslargely to blame. His court at Bordeaux, that of a foreign conqueror, wasextravagant; the 13 sénéchaussées into which the principality was dividedadministratively followed their earlier French pattern and allowed localFrench loyalties to subsist; his relations with the many bishops wereunfriendly, while the greater nobles, Arnaud-Amanieu, sire d'Albret,Gaston II, Count de Foix, and Jean I, Count d'Armagnac, were hostile. Hesummoned several estates, or parliaments, but always to levy taxes. In1367 he undertook to restore Peter the Cruel of Castile to his throne,and though he won a classic victory at Nájera on April 3, 1367, thecampaign ruined his health, his finances, and any prospect of sound rulein Aquitaine, where, in 1368, the nobles and prelates appealed againsthim to Charles V of France as suzerain. Edward's reply to the Frenchking's citation to answer the appellants before the parlement of Paris inMay 1369 is well known--he would appear with 60,000 men at his back. Hehad, however, alienated the towns and peasantry as well as the nobles;and by March 1369 more than 900 towns, castles, and strong places haddeclared against him. Relying on mercenaries whom he could not afford topay, he was powerless to quell the revolt, and the terrible sack ofLimoges (October 1370) merely redounded to his discredit. He returned toEngland a sick and broken man in January 1371 and formally surrenderedhis principality to his father in October 1372, alleging that therevenues of the country were insufficient to defray his expenses. He hadno successor as Prince of Aquitaine.

Edward's position in England, where, throughout his life, he was heirapparent, was that of a typical 14th-century magnate. The registers ofhis household from 1346 to 1348 and from 1351 to 1365 have survived andadd to what is known of him from the chroniclers and from his biographer,the herald of Sir John Chandos. In one important respect all of thesesources paint the same picture, that of a man constantly living beyondhis means. His generosity, however, extended to his tenants as well as tohis knightly companions, and faithful service was rewarded, as in 1356when the ferry of Saltash was granted to William Lenche, who had lost aneye at Poitiers.

The prince visited Chester in 1353 and again in 1358. Cheshire furnishedmany of his archers, who wore a rudimentary uniform of a short coat andhat of green and white cloth with the green on the right. Despite histitle, however, Edward did not visit Wales.

He appears to have shared the interests of his class--jousting, falconry,hunting, gaming. He was literate and conventionally pious, substantiallyendowing a religious house at Ashridge (1376). He had the customary finepresence of the Plantagenets and shared their love of jewels. The BlackPrince's ruby in the present imperial state crown may or may not havebeen given to him by King Peter of Castile after the Battle of Nájera,but he would certainly have prized it, as a connoisseur. Similar artisticinterest is shown in his seals, adorned with their ostrich feathers, andin the elegant gold coins that he issued as Prince of Aquitaine.

The last five years of the prince's life are obscure. Some contemporariessuggest that he supported the Commons when political discontentculminated in the Good Parliament of April 1376; but he knew he wasdying, and he was probably seeking the best means to ensure thesuccession of his second--but only surviving--son, Richard of Bordeaux(afterward Richard II). Edward was buried at Canterbury, where his tombwith his accoutrements, restored and renovated, still stands.

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S240] Unknown author, Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on, Edward.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, III:172.

John 2nd Baron le Strange , of Knockyn, Sir1,2

M, b. 18 May 1282, d. BEF 6 FEB 1310/11
     John 2nd Baron le Strange , of Knockyn, Sir died BEF 6 FEB 1310/11 at Knockin, Oswestry, Shropshire, England.1 He was born on 18 May 1282 at Knockin, Oswestry, Shropshire, England.1,2 He was the son of John 1st Baron le Strange , of Knockyn, Sir and Alianore de Montz.
     John 2nd Baron le Strange , of Knockyn, Sir John (VI) LeStrange, 2nd Lord (Baron) Strange (of Knockyn); born c1282;married Iseult (died on or after 18 May 1324) and died by 6 Feb 1310/1.[Burke's Peerage]

--------------------

BARONY OF STRANGE OF KNOKYN (II)

JOHN (LESTRANGE) VI, LORD STRANGE, son and heir, aged 27 at his father'sdeath. On 6 October 1309 he had done homage and was to have his father'slands. In 1309 and 1310 he was summoned to Parliament as John Lestrangeof Knokyn. He married Iseult. He died on or before 6 February 1310/1. Hiswidow was living 18 May 1324. [Complete Peerage XII/1:353, (transcribedby Dave Utzinger)]

Child of John 2nd Baron le Strange , of Knockyn, Sir and Iseult (Isolda) (?)

Citations

  1. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/1:353.

Maud de Walton1,2,3

F, b. circa 1277, d. before July 1325
     Maud de Walton married an unknown person.4 She was born circa 1277 at Walton Deyville, Warwickshire, England. She married John 1st Baron le Strange , of Knockyn, Sir before 1297.1,3 Maud de Walton married an unknown person before 28 March 1310.2 She died before July 1325 at Knockin, Oswestry, Shropshire, England.2,3
     She Obviously there is a great deal of confusion over everything about Maud,but her first name--and that one of her husbands, at least, was John leStrange. Following are what some respected sources state:

Ancestral Roots (249-32) merely states 'Maud de Walton' (no parents,which at least is the simplest way of dealing with Maud). They cite assource '(CP [Complete Peerage] XII (1) 353, 354; C. L'Estrange Ewen,'Observations on the LeStranges' (1946), chart opp. p. 1; 'LeStrangeRecords', 184-254).'

Magna Charta Sureties (137-4) states 'Maud, perhaps, a de Deyville. (CPXII (1), 352-353; 'Misc. Gen. et Her.', 5th Series, IX 254-8 says she wasdaughter of Sir John de Wauton of Wauton Deyville. See also 'Pedigree andProgress' (Wagner) ped. 57; 'Le Strange Records, 184-253).'

Burke's Peerage states 'Maud, daughter and heiress either of Roger deDeyville, of Walton Deyville, Warwicks, or of Ebles de Montibus, ofKetton, Rutland, leaving (presumably by his 2nd wife, since her putativepaternity would account for the unusual forename Ebles being given to the2nd son).'

He [Thomas Hastang] married, 1stly, before 28 March 1310, Maud, widow ofJohn LE STRANGE, of Knokyn, 1st LORD STRANGE, before that of John deStradling or Strattelinges, daughter and heir of John de Walton, ofLittle Wellesbourne and Walton Deyville, co. Warwick, by his wife Isabel.In 1315 Thomas Hastang and Maud his wife, previously wife of Sir John leStrange, of Knokyn, petitioned concerning the marriage of the son andheir of Madog ap Gruffyd Maelor, which John and Maud had bought for theirdaughter Elizabeth. She died in or before July 1325, by which time he hadmarried, 2ndly, Elizabeth. [Complete Peerage VI:341-3 as corrected byXIV:375, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

He [John Lestrange] married 2ndly Maud, widow of John DE STRADLING, orSTRUTTELINGAS [died shortly before February 1282/3], daughter and heir ofJohn DE WALTON, of Little Wellesborne and Walton Deyville, co. Warwick[died before 28 December 1277], by his wife Isabel. He died on or before8 August 1309. His widow married between 30 October 1309 and 28 November1310, as his 1st wife, Thomas DE HASTANG, of Chebsey, co. Stafford, whodied in or before 1348. She died before July 1325. [Complete PeerageXII/1:352-3, XIV:596]

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Note: It looks like we have 5 choices for Maud: de Walton or Wauton, deDeyville, or de Montibus. I am definitely tilting toward 'Maud deWalton' because of CP & AR. The above citation by CP has been correctedby volume 14. The original had her as 'de Deiville', which would haveadded a 6th choice. Except for the possibility mentioned by BP of Maudbeing 'de Montibus', they are all different names for the same person.The original CP XII/1:352 note (l) (which was deleted by CP XIV:596)explains some of confusion over the different names: 'Dugdale calls herdaughter and heir of Roger de Deyville; and see Cal. Inq.p.m. where JohnLestrange is returned as having held Walton Deyville, co. Warwick, as ofthe inheritance of Maud his wife, of the Earl of Warwick by knightservice. In 1241-42 the manor had been held of the same lord by Robertde Deyville. Blore, however, says that John's wife was Maud, daughterand heir of Ebles de Montibus of Ketton, co. Rutland; and in Cal Inq.p.m.a manor in Ketton is described in 1322 as held of John Lestrange ofDeyville, kinsman and heir of Ebles de Montibus. Possibly Maud wasdaughter of Ebles by the heiress of Deyville; which would account for theunusual name of Ebles given to John's 2nd son.'

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I found the following at the Stradling family website'www.stradling.org.uk/docs/Oth_recs.htm', which touches on the matterbecause Maud de Wauton married John de Stradling as her first husband.The website is quoting material from 'VCH - Warwick extract':

Victoria County History of Warwickshire.

A) vol 3, page 131
'Certain lands in Losley [Loxley, of Robin Hood fame] were sold with themanor of Walton Mauduit by the Earl of Warwick to Simon de Wauton, Bishopof Norwich (1258-66). The bishop conveyed them to John de Wauton, who wasprobably his great-nephew. Subsequently John de Wauton received fromWalter Giffard, Archbishop of York (1266-79), a grant of the two Waltonmanors and all his land in Loxley; this was possibly the carucate and100s. in rents which Henry le Foun and Isabel his wife quitclaimed to thearchbishop in 1278. The archbishop was perhaps acting as trustee for Johnde Wauton whose daughter and heir Maud, was in 1279 a ward of GodfreyGiffard, Bishop of Worcester, Walter's younger brother. Maud married,first John de Stradling by whom she had no issue, and secondly John leStrange. In 1294 it was said that John de Wauton had done homage for hisland in Loxley to the Prior of Kenilworth and that John de Stradling hadoffered to do so, but that, as he had had no issue by his wife, the priorwas unwilling to receive it.'

B) Vol 5, page145,
'The history of the portion of Wellesbourne north and east of the DeneBrook is obscure. Dugdale's assertion that it was granted by one of theancient Earls of Warwick' to a member of the Hastang family is based onlyon the fact that in 1279 a very small estate, half a virgate, in LittleWellesbourne was held by Godfrey Giffard, Bishop of Worcester, of WilliamPacy, who held of Robert Hastang and he of the earl; if there was anysuch mesne lordship it has left no trace. In January 1246 Mr. Simon deWauton (or Walton) received a grant of a weekly market on Wednesday and afair on the eve and day of SS. Peter and Paul at his manor of LITTLEWELLESBOURNE. This Mr. Simon, who bought property in Walton Deyville,became Bishop of Norwich in 1258 and died in 1265. His successor Sir Johnde Wauton died in or shortly before 1277, leaving a widow Isabel, whomarried Henry le Foun, and a young daughter Maud. She married Sir John deStrattelinges, or Stradling, and they had a regrant of the market andFair at Little Wellesboume in 1290. Sir John was dead by February 1293and Maud married John Lestrange of Knockin, who died in 1309, leaving ason John. As her third husband she married Thomas Hastang, who wasreturned in 1316 as holding Walton with the hamlet of Wellesbourne, whichfrom this time onwards becomes known as WELLESBOURNE HASTANG, or moreoften HASTINGS, or WELLESBOURNE LESTRANGE, and descends with the manorsof Walton.

In 1086 the Count of Meulan held two estates of WALTON. One of these wasrated at 5 hides and had been held by Saxi; the other, formerly held byGida and Saied, was of 10 hides. Both came to the Earls of Warwick and in1166 Earl William, in the return of his fees, notes that Walton used torender the service of one knight's fee but was then in demesne and heldby his mother, the Countess Gundred, in dower. The overlordship continuedattached to the earldom and is mentioned as late as 1639.

In the time of Henry I one part of Walton seems to have been held byTheodoric, or Tierry, and the other by Spilebert. When the family ofDeyville, from whom the manor of WALTON DEYVILLE acquired its name,became enfeoffed here is uncertain, but Walter Deyville gave the tithe ofhis mill at Walton to the nuns of Pinley, probably about 1230. RobertDeyville was holding a knight's fee here from the Earl of Warwick in 1242and Walter was granted free warren in his manor of Walton in 1252. Hissuccessor, Roger Deyville, became heavily indebted to the Jews and soldthe manor to Simon de Wauton, who granted it to his son John. This Simonmay have been identical with the Mr. Simon who held the manor ofWelles-bourne Hastings (see above) and who in 1240 bought from WilliamMauduit and Alice his wife 6 acres in Walton called Litlemede lyingbeside the Portwey. Mr. Simon was elderly when he became bishop and maywell have been married when young. John de Wauton died in 1277, and hiswidow Isabel married Henry le Foun. John's heir, his daughter Maud, was achild, and in 1278 Henry and Isabel conveyed the manors of Walton andother lands to Walter Giffard, Archbishop of York. On the death of Walterin the following year these estates passed to his brother GodfreyGiffard, Bishop of Worcester, who in 1281 conveyed them to Robert Burnel,Bishop of Bath and Wells, for life, with remainder to Maud, whom heundertook to marry to one of the elder sons of either his brother HughBurnel or of Sir Robert de Escales. As already mentioned, however, Maudmarried first Sir John de Strattelinges and secondly John Lestrange ofKnockin, and thirdly Thomas Hastang.' Maud de Walton was also known as Maud de Wauton.5 Maud de Walton was also known as Maud de Deyville.6 Maud de Walton was also known as Maud de Montibus.6

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VI:341-3.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/1:352-3, XIV:596.
  4. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VI:342, XIV:371.
  5. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 137-4.
  6. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.

Robert III de Ufford , KG, 1st Earl of Suffolk1,2,3,4

M, b. 9 August 1298, d. 4 November 1369
     Robert III de Ufford , KG, 1st Earl of Suffolk was buried at Campsey Priory, Suffolk, England. He was born on 9 August 1298 at Thurston, Stow, Suffolk, England.3 He was the son of Robert II 1st Baron de Ufford , Sir and Cecily de Valoines. Robert III de Ufford , KG, 1st Earl of Suffolk married Margaret de Norwich, daughter of Walter de Norwich , of Sculthorpe, Sir and Katherine de Hedersete, circa 1320.5 Robert III de Ufford , KG, 1st Earl of Suffolk married Margaret de Norwich, daughter of Walter de Norwich , of Sculthorpe, Sir and Katherine de Hedersete, before 21 October 1329.6 Robert III de Ufford , KG, 1st Earl of Suffolk died on 4 November 1369 at Parham, Plomesgate, Suffolk, England, at age 71.3
     He Suffolk, other creations: It was not till March 1336/7 that there wasanother Earl of Suffolk [after Ralph de Gael, Earl of Norfolk, Suffolk,and Cambridge]. This time the grantee was Robert de Ufford, later also aKnight of the Garter. He was one of Edward III's leading associates inthe early phases of the Hundred Years War. His son William de Ufford,2nd Earl of Suffolk, was also made a KG. [Burke's Peerage, p. 2761]

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Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk, and Margaret, daughter of SirWalter de Norwich. [Ancestral Roots]

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BARONY OF UFFORD (II)

EARLDOM OF SUFFOLK (III, 1)

ROBERT (DE UFFORD), LORD UFFORD, 2nd but 1st surviving son and heir ofRobert (DE UFFORD), 1st LORD UFFORD [1309], by Cecily, daughter andcoheir of Robert DE VALOIGNES, was born 9 August 1298. On 19 May 1318 hewas given seisin of his father's lands, the King having taken his homagethough under age. In 1317 his marriage had been granted to Walter deNorwich, the Treasurer. In March 1324 he was going beyond seas withEdmund, Earl of Kent. On 16 August 1325 he was given seisin of hismother's lands, the King respiting his homage until his return fromGascony. In 1326 he was in commissions to survey the ports and selectships, and thenceforward was in many commissions until his death. On 10May 1329 he was about to go overseas with the King; and on 26 May 1329 isrecorded as having done homage and fealty. On 1 May 1330 he had a grantfor life of the castle and town of Orford, and on 28 November was presentat the delivery of the great seal by the chancellor to the King. InDecember 1336 he was appointed keeper of the forest this side Trent, andso remained until 13 October 1335. On 24 January 1330/1, he was grantedspecific lands in fulfilment of a grant, made with the assent ofParliament, of £200 in land for good service in arresting Mortimer atNottingham. On 27 January 1331/2 he was summoned to Parliament by writdirected Roberto de Ufford, and so until 29 November 1336. On 3 April1335 he obtained a grant to himself and his heirs of free warren invarious manors in Norfolk. On 16 March 1336/7 he was created EARL OFSUFFOLK, with the usual grant of £20 per annum from the farm or revenuesof Suffolk; on 17 March the King granted him further 1000 marks in landand rents; and on 18 March made him yet further grants. On 4 October 1337he was about to set out overseas on the King's service, and he took partin the landing and in the combat at Cadsand in November. He was at thattime captain and admiral of the fleet northwards from the Thames, a postwhich he held for some years. In June 1338 he was with the King atAntwerp, and was a party to a treaty with the chief men of Flanders; andin the same month was appointed with others to treat with the King ofFrance; and again in December 1338. On 15 November 1339 he was appointedto treat with Lewis, Count of Flanders. After the King's return toEngland, he remained with the Earl of Salisbury in garrison at Ypres, butthey were ambushed in an attempt on Lille and captured, taken to Lilleand thence to Paris. He was again in England on 13 January 1340/1, and on16 June following was going beyond seas. On 20 August 1342 he was aboutto set out with 51 men-at-arms and 50 archers on horses. In August 1343he was one of the envoys appointed to treat with the Pope. From 1344 to1347 he was constantly in France, having with him a banneret, 36 knights,58 esquires, and 63 archers, performing numerous duties, landing with theKing as Marshal of the army in 1346, serving in the Prince's division atCrécy, and before Calais with the King in 1347. On 20 October 1346 he wasgranted, for good service, a general pardon, and a pardon for offenceswhile he was steward of the household. K.G. about 1349. On 20 March1349/50 he was one of those appointed to treat for peace with the French.In November 1351 he was again going beyond seas, and in 1355 to Gasconywith the Prince of Wales. In June 1356 he was at Bordeaux with the Princeof Wales, as joint marshal of the host with the Earl of Warwick,intending to cross the Loire into Normandy, and was at the battle ofPoitiers on 19 September. In August 1359 he was going beyond seas withthe King. On 8 February 1361/2 he was appointed with others to treat withthe Count of Flanders, and on 1 February 1363 was present at theconfirmation of the treaty between the King and Peter, King of Castileand Leon. In July 1369 he was with the Duke of Lancaster at Calais.

He married, on or before 21 October 1329, Margaret, widow of Thomas (DECAILLY), LORD CAILLY, daughter of Walter DE NORWICH, and sister to JohnDE NORWICH, 1st Lord norwich, to whose grandson John DE NORWICH, 2nd LORDNORWICH, her issue ultimately became heirs. She died 2 April 1368. Hedied 4 November 1369. Will dated 29 June 1368, directing burial inCampsey Priory and giving inter alia to his son William the sword whichthe King gave him with the name of Earl. [Complete Peerage XII/1:429-32,XIV:602, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

Child of Robert III de Ufford , KG, 1st Earl of Suffolk and Margaret de Norwich

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/1:429-32.
  4. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/2:659-60.
  5. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, II:470.
  6. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/1:432.

Margaret de Norwich1,2,3

F, b. circa 1300, d. 2 April 1368
     Margaret de Norwich was buried at Campsey Priory, Suffolk, England. She married Thomas 1st Baron de Cailly , of Buckenham.4 Margaret de Norwich was born circa 1300 at Mettingham Castle, Wangford, Suffolk, England. She was the daughter of Walter de Norwich , of Sculthorpe, Sir and Katherine de Hedersete. Margaret de Norwich married Robert III de Ufford , KG, 1st Earl of Suffolk, son of Robert II 1st Baron de Ufford , Sir and Cecily de Valoines, circa 1320.4 Margaret de Norwich married Robert III de Ufford , KG, 1st Earl of Suffolk, son of Robert II 1st Baron de Ufford , Sir and Cecily de Valoines, before 21 October 1329.2 Margaret de Norwich died on 2 April 1368 at Parham, Plomesgate, Suffolk, England.2
     She Margaret, daughter of Sir Walter de Norwich. [Ancestral Roots]

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He [Robert de Ufford] married, on or before 21 October 1329, Margaret,widow of Thomas (DE CAILLY), LORD CAILLY, daughter of Walter DE NORWICH,and sister to John DE NORWICH, 1st Lord Norwich, to whose grandson JohnDE NORWICH, 2nd LORD NORWICH, her issue ultimately became heirs. She died2 April 1368. He died 4 November 1369. Will dated 29 June 1368, directingburial in Campsey Priory and giving inter alia to his son William thesword which the King gave him with the name of Earl. [Complete PeerageXII/1:429-32, XIV:602, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

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He [Thomas de Cailly] m. Margaret, daughter of Sir Walter de Norwich, ofMettingham, Suffolk, by Margaret, his wife. He dsp. betweeen 10 May and30 July 1316, which last date is that of the writ for his Inq.p.m. Hiswidow m. probably about 1320, Robert d'Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk, whod. 4 Nov 1369. She d. early in 1368, and was buried in Campsey Priory,Suffolk. [Complete Peerage II:470]

Child of Margaret de Norwich and Robert III de Ufford , KG, 1st Earl of Suffolk

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/1:432.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/2:659-60.
  4. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, II:470.

Walter de Norwich , of Sculthorpe, Sir1,2,3,4

M, b. circa 1274, d. BEF 20 FEB 1328/29
     Walter de Norwich , of Sculthorpe, Sir died BEF 20 FEB 1328/29 at Mettingham Castle, Wangford, Suffolk, England.4 He was buried at Norwich Cathedral, Norfolk, England. He was born circa 1274 at Sculthorpe, Walsingham, Norfolk, England. He was the son of Geoffrey de Norwich , of Stoke, Sir. Walter de Norwich , of Sculthorpe, Sir married Katherine de Hedersete, daughter of John de Hedersete , of Mettingham, Sir, before 1297.4
     Walter de Norwich , of Sculthorpe, Sir WALTER DE NORWICH had a protection February 1297, and, as the King'sclerk, in December 1299 licence to inclose a lane adjoining his messuagein Norwich. He was Remembrancer of the Exchequer, March 1307/8, appointeda Baron, August 1311; Chief Baron, March 1311/2; Treasurer (after servingseveral periods as deputy Treasurer), September 1314 to May 1317. In1315, for his good services as Treasurer, he had a grant of 1,000 marks,to maintain his state more honourably in the King's service. Keeper ofthe office of the Treasurer, November 1319 to February following, andagain in 1321, 1322, and 1324. He was summoned to Councils at York andLincoln, January and June 1312, and (among the justices) to Parliaments,July 1312 onwards. As farmer of the custody of the lands of Thomas deCailly, during the minority of the heir, he was Keeper of BuckenhamCastle, August 1316 till September 1325. In July 1322 he was a member ofthe commission to try the Mortimers, and in 1324 was returned by thesheriff of Norfolk as summoned to attend the Great Council at Westminster.

He m. Catherine, da. of Sir John DE HEDERSETE, and widow of PiersBRAUNCHE. He died between 12 April 1328 and 20 February 1328/9, and wasburied in Norwich Cathedral. His widow had writ for dower, and diedbetween January 1340/1 and October 1343. [CP 9:762-3]

Child of Walter de Norwich , of Sculthorpe, Sir and Katherine de Hedersete

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/1:432.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/2:659-60.
  4. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, IX:762-3.

Katherine de Hedersete1,2

F, b. circa 1275, d. before October 1343
     Katherine de Hedersete married Piers Braunche.2 Katherine de Hedersete was born circa 1275 at Mettingham Castle, Wangford, Suffolk, England. She was the daughter of John de Hedersete , of Mettingham, Sir. Katherine de Hedersete married Walter de Norwich , of Sculthorpe, Sir, son of Geoffrey de Norwich , of Stoke, Sir, before 1297.2 Katherine de Hedersete died before October 1343.2
     Katherine de Hedersete was also known as Katherine Hedersett. She He [Walter de Norwich] m. Catherine, da. of Sir John DE HEDERSETE, andwidow of Piers BRAUNCHE. He died between 12 April 1328 and 20 February1328/9, and was buried in Norwich Cathedral. His widow had writ fordower, and died between January 1340/1 and October 1343. [CP 9:762-3]

Child of Katherine de Hedersete and Walter de Norwich , of Sculthorpe, Sir

Citations

  1. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Marlyn Lewis, 20 Dec 1996.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, IX:762-3.

Geoffrey de Norwich , of Stoke, Sir

M, b. circa 1250
     Geoffrey de Norwich , of Stoke, Sir was born circa 1250 at Stoke, Henstead, Norfolk, England.

Child of Geoffrey de Norwich , of Stoke, Sir

John de Hedersete , of Mettingham, Sir1,2

M, b. circa 1253
     John de Hedersete , of Mettingham, Sir was born circa 1253 at Mettingham Castle, Wangford, Suffolk, England.

Child of John de Hedersete , of Mettingham, Sir

Citations

  1. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Marlyn Lewis, 20 Dec 1996.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, IX:762-3.

Warin de Lisle , of Kingston Lisle, Sir1,2

M, b. before 1277, d. AFT 16 MAR 1321/22
     Warin de Lisle , of Kingston Lisle, Sir died AFT 16 MAR 1321/22 at Drug by horses & hanged at Pontefract, Yorkshire, England.2 He was buried at (reburied in Chilton Foliot), Black Friars, Pontefract. He was born before 1277 at Kingston Lisle, Sparsholt, Berkshire, England.2 He was the son of Gerard de Lisle , of Kingston Lisle and Alice de Armenters , Heiress of Stowe & Burley. Warin de Lisle , of Kingston Lisle, Sir married Alice de Teyes, daughter of Henry 1st Baron Tyeys , of Chilton Foliot, Sir and Hawise de Neville, before 1304.3 Warin de Lisle , of Kingston Lisle, Sir married Alice de Teyes, daughter of Henry 1st Baron Tyeys , of Chilton Foliot, Sir and Hawise de Neville, between 15 January 1310 and 1311.
     Warin de Lisle , of Kingston Lisle, Sir WARIN DE LISLE, son and heir (h) was, as a knight, summoned for militaryservice from May 1298 to May 1319. In 1303 he and others were accused oftheft and assault in Berks, but in 1308 he was a conservator of the peacein the town and University of Oxford (n), and in of the same year wasmade Keeper of Windsor Castle, holding that office till superseded in1319. In 1315 commissioner of Oyer and terminer in Oxfordshire and Berks.In September 1370 he was accused of inciting to assault and murder and ofprotecting the assailants at his manors of Kingston and Beedon, Berks. In1371 he joined with Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, and othersagainst the Despensers, thus allying themselves with Thomas, Earl ofLancaster. Next year, described as a banneret, he was in arms against theKing at Boroughbridge, 16 March 1321/2, and was captured, condemned as atraitor (d), and executed at Pontefract, dragged by horses and hanged,and was buried in the Black Friars' church there.

He married Alice, sister and heir of Henry, and daughter of Henry TEYES(LORDS TEYES), who was aged 30 and more in 1327. In 1334 his widowobtained leave to transfer his body and that of her brother Henry (alsoexecuted and buried in the Carmelites' church in London, to Chilton,Wilts, where her ancestors were buried and where chantries were founded.Though her husband's forfeited estates were given to the Despensers andothers, she was allowed maintenance. In Dec 1326 she had a grant of thecustody of Kingston and other of her husband's manors, and in Marchfollowing had a further grant of all the goods of her late husband andher brother Henry. As all proceedings against Thomas, Earl of Lancaster,and his adherents were annulled in the Parliament of 1 Edward III, theforfeiture of her brother Henry was presumably reversed and she would,according to modern doctrine, be held to have become Baroness Teys orTyes. In 1330 she received a general pardon and in 1332 obtained acharter for markets and fairs at Penzance and other manors in Cornwall,and in 1336 a charter for the free warren at Chilton, Kingston Lisle,etc. She died 2 August 1347 (o). [Complete Peerage VIII:48-9,(transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

(h) He must be distinguished from his contemporary, Warin de Lisle of theRougemont line.

(n) On 2 May the Chancellor, Masters and scholars were informed thatthough Warin de Lisle and another had been so appointed, it was not theKing's intention to infringe their liberties.

(d) He was charged with various felonies, resisting the King at Burton,burning part of the town, etc.

(o) In 1342 she excused her non-attendance at an inquisition on the pleathat she was nurse of the King's son Richard, but it was alleged thatthis was false, the King having no son of that name.

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'I now come (says Dugdale) to Warine de L'Isle, son of Robert, son ofAlice, dau. of Henry, a younger son of Warine FitzGerald, as the descentsheweth.' Which Warine was in the Scottish wars, temp. Edward I and, inthe beginning of Edward II's reign, was constituted governor of WindsorCastle and warden of the forest. For years subsequently he was engaged inScotland, but joining Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, against the Spencers,1320-1, and sharing in the discomfiture of his chief, he was takenprisoner and hanged at York with the Lord Mowbray and several others.After which, it was found in A.D. 1327, that he d. seised of the manorsof Bouden, Kingston, and Fanflore, in Berks; Mundiford, in Norfolk; andKistingbury, in Northamptonshire; leaving Gerard, his son, twenty-threeyears of age, and Alice, his wife, sister and heir of Henry, Baron Teyessurviving. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and ExtinctPeerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 327, L'Isle, Barons deL'Isle]

Child of Warin de Lisle , of Kingston Lisle, Sir and Alice de Teyes

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VIII:48-9.
  3. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Douglas Richardson, 30 Dec 2001.

Alice de Teyes1,2

F, b. before 1297, d. 2 August 1347
     Alice de Teyes was born before 1297 at Fritwell, Oxfordshire, England.2 She was the daughter of Henry 1st Baron Tyeys , of Chilton Foliot, Sir and Hawise de Neville. Alice de Teyes married Warin de Lisle , of Kingston Lisle, Sir, son of Gerard de Lisle , of Kingston Lisle and Alice de Armenters , Heiress of Stowe & Burley, before 1304.3 Alice de Teyes married Warin de Lisle , of Kingston Lisle, Sir, son of Gerard de Lisle , of Kingston Lisle and Alice de Armenters , Heiress of Stowe & Burley, between 15 January 1310 and 1311. Alice de Teyes died on 2 August 1347 at Chilton Foliot, Wiltshire, England.2
     Alice de Teyes was also known as Alice de Tyes. She He married Alice, sister and heir of Henry, and daughter of Henry TEYES(LORDS TEYES), who was aged 30 and more in 1327. In 1334 his widowobtained leave to transfer his body and that of her brother Henry (alsoexecuted and buried in the Carmelites' church in London, to Chilton,Wilts, where her ancestors were buried and where chantries were founded.Though her husband's forfeited estates were given to the Despensers andothers, she was allowed maintenance. In Dec 1326 she had a grant of thecustody of Kingston and other of her husband's manors, and in Marchfollowing had a further grant of all the goods of her late husband andher brother Henry. As all proceedings against Thomas, Earl of Lancaster,and his adherents were annulled in the Parliament of 1 Edward III, theforfeiture of her brother Henry was presumably reversed and she would,according to modern doctrine, be held to have become Baroness Teys orTyes. In 1330 she received a general pardon and in 1332 obtained acharter for markets and fairs at Penzance and other manors in Cornwall,and in 1336 a charter for the free warren at Chilton, Kingston Lisle,etc. She died 2 August 1347 (o). [Complete Peerage VIII:48-9,(transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

(o) In 1342 she excused her non-attendance at an inquisition on the pleathat she was nurse of the King's son Richard, but it was alleged thatthis was false, the King having no son of that name.

Child of Alice de Teyes and Warin de Lisle , of Kingston Lisle, Sir

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VIII:49.
  3. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Douglas Richardson, 30 Dec 2001.

Henry 1st Baron Tyeys , of Chilton Foliot, Sir1,2,3

M, b. after 1263, d. before 8 October 1307
     Henry 1st Baron Tyeys , of Chilton Foliot, Sir was born after 1263 at Alverton, Cornwall, England.3 He married Hawise de Neville before 1285.3 Henry 1st Baron Tyeys , of Chilton Foliot, Sir died before 8 October 1307 at Chilton Foliot, Wiltshire, England.3
     He BARONY OF TYEYS (I)

HENRY TYEYS, son and heir, was a minor in 1284, when he had succeeded tothe Foliot estates. He served in Wales in 1287 and 1292, was exempt fromservice in Gascony in 1294, and was summoned for service across the seasand to Flanders in 1297 and against the Scots, 1299-1306. He was alsosummoned to attend the King on urgent business in 1294 and was called toa milita Council before Edward, the King's son, September 1297. In March1296/7 he was appointed to answer for the surrender of the clergy inHants; and on 22 August in the same year he was among the supporters ofthe Earls of Norfolk and Hereford, when they appeared before theExchequer to protest against the King's actions. He fought in thevanguard at the battle of Falkirk, 22 July 1298, and was present at thesiege of Carlaverock, July 1300. He was summoned to Parliament from 6February 1298/9 to 26 August 1307, by writs directed Henrico Tyeys,whereby he is held to have become LORD TYEYS.

He married, before 1285, Hawise. He died shortly before 8 October 1307and was probably buried at Chilton Foliat. His widow died circa 1322.[Complete Peerage XII/2:103, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

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In the time of King Henry III, Henry de Tyes held Shireburne, inOxfordshire, by the grant of Richard, Earl of Cornwall, and was summonedto parliament as a Baron from 6 February, 1299, to 26 August, 1307. Inthe 28th Edward I [1300], his lordship had free warren in all his demesnelands at Shireburne and Allerton, both in the co. Oxford. He d. in 1208,and was s. by his son, Henry de Tyes, 2nd baron. [Sir Bernard Burke,Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd.,London, 1883, p. 542, Tyes, Baron Tyes] Henry 1st Baron Tyeys , of Chilton Foliot, Sir was also known as Henry 1st Baron Teyes , of Chilton Foliot, Sir.

Child of Henry 1st Baron Tyeys , of Chilton Foliot, Sir and Hawise de Neville

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VIII:49.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/2:103.

Hawise de Neville1,2

F, b. circa 1265, d. circa 1322
     Hawise de Neville was born circa 1265 at Laceby, Grimsby, Lincolnshire, England.1 She married Henry 1st Baron Tyeys , of Chilton Foliot, Sir before 1285.2 Hawise de Neville died circa 1322.2
     She He [Henry Tyeys] married, before 1285, Hawise. He died shortly before 8October 1307 and was probably buried at Chilton Foliat. His widow diedcirca 1322. [Complete Peerage XII/2:103, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

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Following is a post to SGM, 30 Dec 2001, by Douglas Richardson, with apossible ancestry for Hawise. Later on he speculated that since Geoffreyde Neville supposedly died without issue, that maybe Hawise was thedaughter of an unknown 2nd marriage of Hawise de Montagu.

From: Douglas Richardson (royalancestry AT msn.com)
Subject: Ancestry of Alice Tyes, wife of Warin de Lisle
Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
Date: 2001-12-30 07:07:42 PST

Dear Newsgroup ~

Warin de Lisle, of Kingston Lisle (in Sparsholt), Berkshire (died 1322)married before 1304 Alice, daughter of Henry Teyes, Lord Teyes, ofAlverton, Cornwall, and Chilton Foliat, Wiltshire, by his wife, Hawise.

Complete Peerage sub Lisle (vol. 8, pg. 49) states that in 1334, Alice,widow of Warin de Lisle, had leave to transfer the bodies of her latehusband and that of her brother, Henry Teyes, Lord Teyes, to Chilton,'where her ancestors were buried and where chantries were founded.' Itappears she was supported in her petition to have remove the bodies byher kinsman, William de Montagu, Earl of Salisbury, which fact isoverlooked by Complete Peerage. For the Earl's support of Alice deLisle, see Calendar of the Register of Simon de Montacute, Bishop ofWorcester, 1334-1337, published 1996, pp.xviii, xxvii.

Clearly the connection between Alice de Lisle and the Earl of Salisburymust have been close. However, to date, no one has identified theconnection between the two parties. A good bet, however, is that theconnection comes through Alice de Lisle's mother, Hawise (wife of HenryTeyes), born say 1265. Reviewing the Montagu family tree, it seems adistinct possibility that Hawise Teyes was the daughter of the Earl ofSalisbury's great aunt, Hawise de Montagu, who married Geoffrey deNeville, of Laceby, co. Lincoln. I say that because I have encountered arecord which shows that Henry Teyes and Ingram Folenfaunt, and theirwives, held property as co-parceners in Redbourne, Lincoln in 1285[Reference: Cal. IPM]. Redbourne is associated with a Neville family,although I am unclear if this is same family as the Neville family ofLaceby.

If Alice de Lisle's grandmother was Hawise de Montagu, this arrangementwould make Alice and her kinsman, the Earl of Salisbury, second cousins.If correct, then Alice de Lisle would share the Earl's descent from thebaronial Basset family of Buckinghamshire and from the Gay family ofWiltshire.

If anyone has any particulars on the Neville, Teyes, Lisle or Folenfauntfamilies that would shed some light on this matter, I would appreciateknowing about it. For the interest of the newsgroup, I have listed thecolonial immigrants below who descend from Alice (Teyes) de Lisle.

Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

E-mail: royalancestry AT msn.com

- - - - - - - - - - -

Immigrants descended from Alice Teyes, wife of Warin de Lisle:

1. Elizabeth Bosvile.

2. George, Giles & Robert Brent.

3. St.Leger Codd.

4. Edward Digges.

5. Warham Horsmanden.

6. Anne Humphrey.

7. Anne Mauleverer.

8. Philip & Thomas Nelson.

9. Herbert Pelham.

10. Katherine Saint Leger.

11. John West.

Child of Hawise de Neville and Henry 1st Baron Tyeys , of Chilton Foliot, Sir

Citations

  1. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Douglas Richardson, 30 Dec 2001.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/2:103.

Ralph 1st Baron de Greystoke , Sir1,2

M, b. 15 August 1299, d. 14 July 1323
     Ralph 1st Baron de Greystoke , Sir was born on 15 August 1299 at Greystoke, Penrith, Cumberland, England.2 He married Baroness Alice de Audley, daughter of Hugh 1st Baron de Audley , of Stratton, Sir and Isolde (Iseult) de Mortimer, after 25 November 1317.3 Ralph 1st Baron de Greystoke , Sir died on 14 July 1323 at Poisoned at Gateshead, Durham, England, at age 23.2 He married Baroness Alice de Audley, daughter of Hugh 1st Baron de Audley , of Stratton, Sir and Isolde (Iseult) de Mortimer, after 5 August 1367.1
     Ralph 1st Baron de Greystoke , Sir BARONY OF FITZWILLIAM (II, 3) 1317

BARONY OF GREYSTOKE (I) 1321

RALPH DE GREYSTOKE, feudal Lord of Greystoke, son and heir of Robert FITZRALPH, by Elizabeth, his wife, and grandson and heir of Sir Ralph FITZWILLIAM, of Grimthorpe and Hildreskelf, co. York [LORD FiTZWILLIAM]; wasborn 15 August 1299. On the death of his father, April 1317, he becamefeudal Lord of Greystoke, and, according to modern doctrine, LORDFITZWILLIAM. On 19 August 1317 the King granted him the manors ofGrimthorpe, Crossthwaite, Thorpe Bassett, and Neasham (all held insocage, but not of the King), he being then aged 18 and more. On 27August 1320, being of full age, though he had not proved his age, he hadlivery of the lands of his inheritance, his homage and fealty beingrespited: on 7 October following, having proved his age, he had livery ofthe knights' fees and advowsons of his inheritance, his homage beingrespited. He was summoned to Parliament from 15 May 1321 to 18 September1322, by writs directed Radulpho de Craystok', or Creystok', whereby heis held to have become LORD GREYSTOKE. In 1319 he was about to go toScotland with Hugh Daudele the younger. He fought for the King at thebattle of Boroughbridge, 16 March 1321/2.

He married, after 25 November 1317,[f] Alice, sister of Hugh, EARL OFGLOUCESTER, and daughter of Hugh (AUDLEY), LORD AUDLEY, by Iseude, widowof Sir Walter DE BALUN, of Much Marcle, co. Hereford, and daughter of SirEdmund DE MORTIMER, of Wigmore, co. Hereford. He died at Gateshead, beingpoisoned, 14 July 1323, aged nearly 24, and was buried in NewminsterAbbey. His widow had livery of her dower, 12 August and 27 September1323, and of the knights' fees, cornages, and advowsons of her dower, 18and 26 December following, all of which had been assigned to her by theKing. She married, 2ndly (royal licence, 14 Jan. 1326/7) Sir Ralph DENEVILL, of Raby, co. Durham [LORD NEVILL]. He died 5 August 1367, and wasburied in Durham Cathedral Church. She died 13 January 1374/5, and wasburied with him. [Complete Peerage 6:190-1, transcribed by DaveUtzinger)]

[f] Request by the King, for a papal dispensation that Ralph Craystoke,of the diocese of York, and Alice de Audele the King's kinswoman, of thediocese of Coventry and Lichfield, might intermarry, although the saidRalph and Alice are related in the 4th-3rd degrees on consanguinity;Windsor, 25 November 11 [not 12] Edward II.

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Ralph de Greystock, b. 1298, which surname he assumed, was summoned toparliament by that designation from 15 May, 1321, to 17 September, 1322.His lordship, by virtue of a special dispensation from the Pope, m.Alice*, dau. of Hugh, Lord Audley, they being within the 3rd and 4thdegrees of consanguinity; and had an only son, William. Lord Greystockhaving been a principal in seizing Sir Gilbert de Middleton in the castleof Mitford for treason, was soon afterward poisoned, which at breakfast,through a contrivance of that person. He was s. by his son, William deGreystock, 4th baron.

* Dugdale, in one place, calls this lady, 'Alice de Audeley,' dau. ofHugh, Lord Audeley, and in another, 'Alice,' dau. of Ralph, Lord Nevill.[Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd,London, 1883, p. 254, Greystock, Barons Greystock]

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VI:190-1, V:518.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VI:190-1.

Jasper Tudor , Duke of Bedford1

M, b. after 1430, d. 21 December 1495
     Jasper Tudor , Duke of Bedford was buried at Keynsham Abbey, Somerset, England. He was born after 1430 at Hatfield, Leominster, Hertfordshire, England.1 He married Catherine Wydeville, daughter of Richard Wydeville , 1st Earl Rivers and Jacquette de Luxembourg, before 7 November 1485.1 Jasper Tudor , Duke of Bedford died on 21 December 1495; (dsp legit.)1
     He EARLDOM OF PEMBROKE (XVI, 1) 1452? to 1461 and 1485 to 1495

DUKEDOM OF BEDFORD (III, 1)

JASPER TUDOR, called OF HATFIELD, was born about 1430, at Hatfield,Herts, being, 2nd son of Sir Owen TUDOR, 1495, by Katharine, QUEENDOWAGER OF ENGLAND, daughter of CHARLES VI, KING OF FRANCE. Being thusuterine brother to King Henry VI, he was knighted by him 25 December1449, and was, on 23 November 1452, created EARL OF PEMBROKE, with placeand precedency in Parliament and elsewhere immediately below his elderbrother, Edmond, Earl of Richmond (created the same day), who had placeand precedency immediately after all Dukes. Elected K.G. before 23 April1459. For his energetic support of the House of Lancaster he wasattainted, 4 November 1461. He took an active part in the temporaryrestoration (9 October 1470 to 14 April 1471) of Henry VI, when he wasrestored to his honours, but was again attainted in 1471, having, afterthe battle of Barnet (14 April 1471), fled into Brittany. On theaccession of his nephew, Henry VII, to the Crown, he was, on 27 October1485, created DUKE OF BEDFORD, and on 12 December following was againrestored to the Earldom of Pembroke by Parliament. P.C., 1485. HighSteward of Oxford University 1485-92. LORD DEPUTY OF IRELAND, 1486-94.One of the commissioners for the High Steward at the Coronation of theQueen Consort, and Bearer of her Crown there at,10 November 1487.

He married, before 7 November 1485, Katharine, widow of Henry (STAFFORD),DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM, 6th daughter and coheir of Richard (WIDVILLE), EARLRIVERS, by Jacqueline, daughter of Pierre DE LUXEMBOURG, COUNT OF ST POL,and sister of Elizabeth, Queen Consort of Edward IV. He died s.p. legit.,21 December 1495, aged about 65, and was buried in the Abbey of Keynsham,when all his honours became extinct. His widow, who was aged above 34 on4 August 1492, married (as his 1st wife) Sir Richard WINGFIELD, K.G., ofKimbolton Castle, Hunts, who died 22 July 1525, at Toledo, in Spain.[Complete Peerage II:73, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

NOTE: The estimated birth date of 1430, given above (and also by CP X:397in the Pembroke article) may be misleading. His elder brother EdmundEarl of Richmond (father of Henry VII) was also born c1430, but in Hadham(not the same town, so they couldn't very well be twins). I am makingJasper 'aft. 1430' to indicate he was younger. It is conceivable, thoughnot very, that they were both born the same year. Jasper Tudor , Duke of Bedford was also known as 3rd1st Duke of Bedford , Jasper Tudor. Jasper Tudor , Duke of Bedford was also known as 16th1st Earl of Pembroke , Jasper Tudor.2

Citations

  1. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, II:73.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, X:397-9.

Roger 1st Baron Damory , of Bletchingdon, Sir1,2,3

M, b. circa 1284, d. between 14 March 1321 and 1322
     Roger 1st Baron Damory , of Bletchingdon, Sir was buried at St Mary's Ware, Hertfordshire, England. He was born circa 1284 at Bletchingdon, Oxfordshire, England. He married Elizabeth de Clare, daughter of Gilbert de Clare , Earl Gloucester & Hertford and Joan 'of Acre' Plantagenet , Princess of England, before 3 May 1317.1,2,3 Roger 1st Baron Damory , of Bletchingdon, Sir died between 14 March 1321 and 1322 at Tutbury Castle, Staffordshire, England; (as a prisoner.)1,2,3
     He Roger Damory, Lord Damory, d. 13 or 14 Mar 1321/2, of Bletchington, co.Oxford, MP 1317-1321. [Magna Charta Sureties]

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BARONY OF DAMORY (I)

SIR ROGER DAMORY, of Bletchingdon, Oxon, younger brother of Sir RichardDAMORY [LORD DAMORY], and younger son of Sir Robert DAMORY, of Bucknellin that co. He was an associate of Edward II, who gave him, 11 February13 I 6/7, the manor of Holton, Oxon. Having married the King's niece, hewas granted, 3 May and 6 July 1317, on this account and for his goodservices at the battle of Bannockburn, the manors of Sandal, co. York,and Vauxhall, Surrey to him and his wife, Elizabeth, and his heirs.Keeper of the Castle and Honour of Knaresborough, 24 December 1314 to 18October 13 17, and 4 Mar 13 17/8 to 27 May 1318; of Corfe Castle and theForest of Purbeck 20 February 1317/8 to 8 May 1321; of St. Briavel'sCastle and the Forest of Dean, 4 June 1318 to 11 April 1321. He wassummoned for Military Service from 20 May 1317 to 22 May 1319, and toParliament from 20 November 1317 to 15 May 1321, by writs directed RogeroDamory or Dammory, whereby he is held to have become LORD DAMORY. Hislands were taken into the King's hand, 18 October, but restored 2December 1317. He took an active part in 'pursuing' the Despeiisers, forwhich he received a pardon, 20 August 1321 in accordance with theagreement made in Parliament. Was one of the principal contrariants, andwas engaged in the capture of Gloucester, the burning of Bridgnorth, theseige of Tickhill, and the conflict at Burton-on-Trent. His lands weretaken into the King's hand, and various orders for his arrest issued, 7December 1321 to 11 March 1321/2. On the retreat before the King'sforces, being sick. or mortally wounded he was left behind at Tutbury,where he was captured, 11 March, tried and condemned to death butrespited, 13 March 1321/2.

He married, about April (before 3 May) 1317, Elizabeth 3rd sister of thewhole blood and coheir of Gilbert EARL OF GLOUCESTER AND HERTFORD,daughter of Gilbert (DE CLARE), EARL OF GLOUCESTER AND HERTFORD, by his2nd wife, Joan OF ACRE, daughter of KING EDWAID I. She had married,1stly, 30 September 1308, at Waltham Abbey, in the King's presence, JohnDE BURGH (son and heir apparent of Richard, EARL OF ULSTER), who diedv.p., 18 June 1313, at Galway; and, 2ndly, as 2nd wife, 4 February1315/6, near Bristol, against the King's will and without his licence,Sir Theo bald DE VERDUN, of Alton, co. Stafford [LORD VERDUN], who diedat Alton Castle, 27 July, and was buried 19 September 1316, in CroxdenAbbey. She, who had livery of her dower, 6 December 1316, had, with her3rd husband, livery of the knights' fees and advowsons of her said dower,26 June, of her dower [IRL], 26 September, and, the King having taken hisfealty 22 May, of her inheritance, 15 November 1317. He died 13 or 14March 1321/2, at Tutbury Castle, and was buried in St. Mary's, Ware. On16 March his widow was imprisoned in the Abbey of Barking, and there,under duress and fear of death for herself and her son, was forced togrant her lordships in Wales to the younger Despenser and his wife. Shehad livery of her inheritance in England and Ireland, 2 November 1322. AtChristmas following, at the instigation of the younger Despenser, she wasplaced under arrest at York, till she signed a bond by which sheundertook not to marry nor to dispose of any of her lands without theKing's licence, on pain of forfeiting all she possessed . Her lands weretaken into the King's hand, 7 January 1322/3, as she had left the Kingwithout his licence. They were restored to her, 17 February 1326/7, andthe King took her homage therefore, 20 December 1327. She endowedUniversity Hall, Cambridge, 8 April 1336, becoming Founder thereof, 6April 1338. Founder (lic. 1 February 1346/7) of a House of Friars: Minorsat Walsingham, Norfolk. She, who was aged 19 or 20 at her brother's deathin 1314, died 4 November 1360, and was buried, with her 3rd husband, inSt. Mary's, Ware. [Complete Peerage IV:42-45, (transcribed by DaveUtzinger)] Roger 1st Baron Damory , of Bletchingdon, Sir was also known as Roger 1st Baron d' Amorie, of Bletchingdon.

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 40-5.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, IV:42-45.