Ralph de Arderne , of Preston, Sir1

M, b. circa 1248, d. after April 1283
     Ralph de Arderne , of Preston, Sir married an unknown person. He was born circa 1248 at Preston, Steyning, Sussex, England. He married Isabella de Mortimer, daughter of Roger de Mortimer , Lord of Wigmore and Maud de Braose, before 1273.1 Ralph de Arderne , of Preston, Sir died after April 1283.1

Citations

  1. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, I:240.

Simon VI de Montfort , 2nd Earl of Leicester1,2,3

M, b. circa 1208, d. 4 August 1265
     Simon VI de Montfort , 2nd Earl of Leicester was buried at Evesham, Worcestershire, England. He was born circa 1208 at Montfort-l'Amaury, Yvelines, Ile-de-France, France.1,2,3 He married Eleanor Plantagenet , Princess of England between 7 January 1238 and 1239 at Kings Chapel, Westminster Palace, Middlesex, England.1,2,3 Simon VI de Montfort , 2nd Earl of Leicester died on 4 August 1265 at Battle of Evesham, Worcestershire, England.1,2,3
     He EARLDOM OF CHESTER (X, 1) 1264 to 1265

EARLDOM OF LEICESTER (VI, 2) 1239-1265

Simon de Montfort, younger brother of Amauri, being 3rd son of Simon, wasb. probably in 1208, and certainly not later than 1209. His quitclaim tohis brother Amauri of his inheritance in France was probably madeimmediately on his coming of age. In return he received, perhaps at thesame time, Amauri's letter to Henry III, dated Paris, Feb? 1228/9. Withthis letter Simon came to England, probably in the early spring of 1229,but returned without obtaining the favour he sought. Communications musthave been kept up, because on 6 Feb 1230 Henry III, by letters patent ofcurious form, acknowledged that, at the petition and demise of Amauri deMontfort, son and heir of Simon de Montfort, late Earl of Leicester, heis bound to restore to Simon, son of the elder Simon and brother ofAmauri, all the lands that Simon the father held in England of the Honourof Leicester, with the third penny of the county and the Stewardship, assoon as the said lands should be delivered out of the hand of the Earl ofChester. Meanwhile, on 22 July 1229, the two years' truce with Francehad expired. Troops were assembled at Portsmouth for a French expeditionin Oct 1229; but, the shipping provided being deficient, the enterprisehad to be postponed, and a muster for the same purpose was appointed atReading, 7 Apr 1230. To this muster Simon, now in possession of Henry'sattested promise, sent his knight to offer his sword to England. It wasaccepted by a letter dated at Reading, 8 Apr, in which Henry granted himan annuity of 400 marks until he received his inheritance, so that heshould serve England, and Simon presumably fought for the English onFrench soil during Henry's pitiable campaign in Brittany, May-Oct 1230.When Henry embarked (26 Oct) he left behind him the Earl Marshal, and (atthe castle of Saint-James de Beuvron on the Norman border) the Earl ofChester. Simon repaired to the Earl there, and induced him to make thesurrender of which Henry had made a condition. They returned together toEngland in Aug 1231, and on the 13th of that month Henry took Simon'shomage at Castle Maud, co. Radnor. During Aug and possibly afterreceiving news that the lands had been delivered to Simon, Amauri wroteagain to Henry III, asking him to put Simon in possession of all therights attached to the inheritance. At Queen Eleanor's Coronation, 20Jan 1235/6, Simon was appointed to act as High Steward, in spite of theopposition of the Earl of Norfolk. From now on Simon graduallyestablished himself in England. He was acting in the King's Council in1237, and had now so completely gained Henry's friendship that the lattergave him his sister Eleanor in marriage in Jan 1237/8. But it appears,not unnaturally, to have required Amauri's personal surrender to the Kingbefore Simon could be invested with the Earldom of Leicester, and thisbrilliant alliance, followed by the birth of a son in Nov, apparentlystirred Amauri to action on Simon's behalf, for he came to England earlynext year, and made the surrender at Westminster, 11 Apr 1239, that beingprobably the date of Simon's investiture as EARL OF LEICESTER. Simon wasgodfather in June to Henry's first son, Prince Edward, and in 1240 hewent on crusade to the Holy Land. In 1242 he took part in Henry'sunsuccessful expedition to Poitou, and in the battle of Saintes, 22July. He participated in state affairs in 1244, as one of the 12commissioners appointed to consider the King's demands for money. In May1248, he was appointed Viceregent in Gascony, with powers not of aLieutenant, but as of the King himself; on 20 Sep of that year he sealeda prolongation of the truce between England and France. In Aug 1254 hewas sent from Bordeaux to Scotland on a secret mission to the King. InMay and June of 1255 he was engaged with Peter of Savoy, negotiating arenewal of the truce with France. Early in 1257 the plenipotentiates totreat of peace with France were directed to take control with Simon deMontfort and Peter de Savoy; in June 1257 he was appointed jointcommissioner to deal with the Pope about the business of the Kingdom ofSicily, he and Peter de Savoy being the two plenipotentiaries. In May1258 he was join commissioner for a truce with France, and in Aug to makepeace between the warring parites in Scotland. May of 1259 saw himappointed commissioner under the treaty with France, and in July he wassent with Peter de Savoy with a verbal message to the French King. Duringthat year he was sworn of the King's Council; in Dec. the CountessEleanor, in Paris, in the presence of the Henry III and St. Louis, and ofher husband, who attested and confirmed her acts, renounced all herrights in the Duchy of Normandy, and ratified the peace concluded withFrance. At Henry's great feast on St. Edward's day 1260, the King'snephew, Henry, son of the Earl of Cornwall, was admitted to do the officeof Steward, as Simon's proxy. In Aug 1262 the Earl was jointcommissioner to treat with Llewelyn son of Griffith. His part in theopposition of the Barons to the King and the ensuing civil war is thenational history of those momentous years. After his victory at Lewes,when Henry III and Prince Edward were made prisoners (14 May 1264), Simoncarried on the government of the country under the King's name and seal,including the summoning of a parliament for the Octave of Hilary 1265.During this period he obtained grants of the earldom of Chester. Allthese his actes were annulled by Henry on his restoration to freedom bythe battle of Evesham, 4 Aug 1265, when Simon was slain, and all hishonours forfeited. He was buried by the monks at Evesham. His will wasmade 1 Jan 1259.

He m. 7 Jan 1237/8, privately, in the King's chapel in Westminster,Eleanor, 2nd daughter of King John, by Isabel, daughter and heir ofAimar, Count of Agouleme (a). She, who was b. 1215, had been betrothed,23 Apr 1224, to William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke. She d. 13 Apr 1275,in France, at Montargis, a cell of Fontrevault, to which she retiredafter the battle of Evesham. [Complete Peerage VII:543-7]

(a) After the Earl of Pembroke's death Eleanor, with her governess Cicelyde Sanford, widow of Sir William de Gorham, had made to the Archbishop ofCanterbury a public vow of perpetual celibacy. Such a vow did not,however, constitute a canonical impediment. Soon after he marriedEleanor, Simon de Montfort went to Rome, and obtained a papl absolutionin respect of this vow. . . By his wife Simon had issue: sons Henry,Simon, Guy, Amauri, and Richard, and a daughter Eleanor who m. Llewelynof Wales. Henry was slain with his father at Evesham; Simon arrived onthe field of battle only in time to see his father's head on a pike, andGuy was wounded and taken prisoner. He and Simon were forced to leavethe country, and went to Italy, where they served under Charles ofAnjou. In 1271 they murdered their cousin Henry, son of Richard, Earl ofCornwall, in a church at Viterbo. Simon died in the same year nearSiena, and Guy died in a Sicilian prison in 1287 or 1288. Amauri wasappointed canon and treasurer of York Minster in 1265. He was living Feb1300/1. In his will, made at Montargis in 1289, he styles himself papalchaplain, treasurer of St. Peter of York, canon of Rouen, Evreux, London,and Lincoln, rector of St. Wendron in the diocese of Exeter, byhereditary right Earl of Leicester and Palatine of Chester, Steward ofthe King of England. Of Richard nothing is known. Lipscomb prints anaccount identifying this Richard with Richard de Wellesburne, buried atHughenden; in forming an opinion of the statements there made, it shouldbe borne in mind that Wellesbourne was one of the Warwickshire manors ofthe other family of Montfort.

------------------------------

Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester (b. c. 1208, Montfort,Ile-de-France, Fr.--d. Aug. 4, 1265, Evesham, Worcestershire, Eng.),leader of the baronial revolt against King Henry III and ruler of Englandfor less than a year.

Simon de Montfort, wholly French by birth and education, was the son ofSimon de Montfort l'Amaury, leader of the crusade against the hereticalAlbigenses. On coming of age, he renounced to his eldest brother, Amaury,his claims on the family lands in return for the sole right to revive theMontfort claim to the English earldom of Leicester. This claim derivedfrom his mother sic. grandmother), Amicia, sister of Robert IV (died1204), the last Beaumont earl of Leicester, whose lands had been dividedbetween Amicia and her younger sister Margaret, countess of Winchester.King John had recognized Simon's father as earl (c. 1205) but haddeprived him as a French subject (1207), and the Montfort claim had thenlapsed.

Simon came to England in 1229 and, helped by his cousin Ranulf, earl ofChester, the tenant of the confiscated estates, obtained the honour ofLeicester and did homage to Henry III in 1231, though he was not formallystyled earl of Leicester until April 1239. He speedily became one ofHenry's favourites, receiving an annual fee of 500 marks to compensatefor the divided inheritance and exercising the hereditary stewardship atthe coronation of Queen Eleanor (Eleanor of Provence; 1236). Henryarranged for his sister Eleanor to marry Simon on Jan. 7, 1238, thusbreaking Eleanor's earlier vow of chastity and offending the Englishnoblemen, who were not consulted. Henry's brother, Richard, earl ofCornwall, led an angry baronial protest, and Henry, alarmed, turnedagainst Simon and Eleanor, driving them from England (August 1239). Simonwent on crusade (1240-42) with Richard, with whom he was now reconciled,and won great prestige among the lords of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem,who asked their absentee king, the emperor Frederick II, to appoint Simonas his viceroy there. Returning to England, Simon joined Henry'sdisastrous invasion of France (1242), winning distinction by coveringHenry's escape after his defeat at Saintes. Reconciled with Henry, andaccepting an unfavourable settlement of Countess Eleanor's dower claims,Simon now made Kenilworth Castle (a royal grant) his headquarters. Hecultivated the friendship of the radical reformer Robert Grosseteste,bishop of Lincoln, and took Robert's friend, the Oxford Franciscan Adamde Marisco, as spiritual director. Although regarded as a king's man,Simon was one of the committee of 12 appointed to handle the acute crisisof 1244 between Henry and his angry barons. He also took part in manyimportant embassies to the French, papal, and imperial courts, and as aresult he won many influential friends.

In 1248 Henry asked Simon to pacify the English-held Duchy of Gascony, insouthwestern France. Simon, eager to join Louis IX's crusade, acceptedreluctantly, stipulating for full powers as regent for seven years,without fear of recall and with full refund of expenses incurred.Treating the Gascon nobles as faithless rebels outside the law, heruthlessly crushed the revolt and restored order; the Gascons appealed toHenry, accusing Simon of illegal procedure and oppression and threateningto renew their revolt. The matter was complicated by Simon's personalcontest with Gaston de Béarn, the leading rebel. Henry, frightened,recalled Simon for trial on the rebels' charges; the English magnatesacquitted him (1252), and he returned to Gascony to suppress the renewedrevolt, but Henry now terminated his lieutenancy. Simon, accepting apartial financial settlement, withdrew to France, though Henry had toimplore his help in his own campaign against the rebels in 1253. Such wasSimon's international reputation that when Louis IX's mother, Blanche ofCastile, died (November 1252) while Louis was still on crusade, theFrench magnates invited Simon to succeed her as regent.

Henry's behaviour over Gascony, though not wholly unjustified, convincedSimon that Henry was unfit to rule, and the King's disastrousundertaking, at Pope Innocent IV's behest, to conquer Sicily for his sonEdmund, strengthened this conviction. Discussions with Grosseteste,Marisco, and other Franciscan intellectuals had fired Simon's mind withvisions of a new order in both church and state, and he joined the otherleading English barons in forcing upon Henry the revolutionary Provisionsof Oxford (June 1258). The reformers began well, but by October 1259divisions appeared between the conservative wing, led by Richard deClare, earl of Gloucester, that sought only to limit abuses of royalpower, and the radical element, led by Simon, that sought to bind theentire baronage to observe the reforms forced upon the King and hisofficers. Simon exacerbated the quarrel by his arrogant vehemence and puthimself in the wrong by attempting to use Henry's subordination to securesettlement of his own and his wife's justifiable personal claims onHenry. Henry, allying with the Gloucester faction, shattered baronialunity early in 1260, and Simon emerged leading the extremist defenders ofthe reforms. By October 1261 Henry had isolated Simon, who went abroad;but the King's annulment of the Provisions, after he had received papalabsolution from his oath to observe them, revived general disaffection(1262), and Simon returned (April 1263) to lead a rebellion that restoredthe Provisions (July 1263). But baronial unity had vanished, and, despitepassionate support from the lesser barons, the county knights, the men ofLondon and the Cinque Ports, and many clergy, Simon was forced to acceptarbitration by Louis IX (December 1263). By the Mise of Amiens (January1264) Louis totally annulled the Provisions and all consequent reforms:Simon rejected the award and after unsuccessfully attempting directnegotiations, defeated Henry at Lewes (May 14, 1264), capturing Henry andhis son, the lord Edward.

Simon then governed England by military dictatorship, strivingunsuccessfully for a legal basis of consent, both by negotiations withHenry's supporters and by calling representatives of both shires andboroughs to Parliament (1265) to counterbalance his lack of baronialsupport. But his monopolization of power alienated his chief ally, theyoung Gilbert de Clare, earl of Gloucester, who joined the royalistMarcher lords and secured Lord Edward's escape at Hereford (May 1265). Byrapid and skillful maneuvering, Edward isolated Simon behind the Severn,destroyed at Kenilworth (August 1) the large army coming to his rescue,and trapped Simon's little force at Evesham (Aug. 4, 1265), slaying Simonand most of his followers.

The most outstanding English personality of his day, Simon is rememberedas an early[ advocate of a limited monarchy, ruling through electedcouncillors and responsible officials, and of parliaments includingcounty knights and burgesses as well as the great nobles. [EncyclopædiaBritannica CD 97] Simon VI de Montfort , 2nd Earl of Leicester was also known as 6th2nd Earl of Leicester , Simon de Montfort. Simon VI de Montfort , 2nd Earl of Leicester was also known as 10th1st Earl of Chester , Simon de Montfort.4

Child of Simon VI de Montfort , 2nd Earl of Leicester and Eleanor Plantagenet , Princess of England

Citations

  1. [S240] Unknown author, Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on, Montfort, Simon.
  2. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VII:543-7.
  4. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, III:170-1.

Eleanor Plantagenet , Princess of England1,2,3

F, b. 1215, d. 13 April 1275
     Eleanor Plantagenet , Princess of England was born in 1215 at Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England.2,3 She married William Marshal , 5th Earl of Pembroke on 23 April 1224.2 Eleanor Plantagenet , Princess of England married Simon VI de Montfort , 2nd Earl of Leicester between 7 January 1238 and 1239 at Kings Chapel, Westminster Palace, Middlesex, England.1,2,3 Eleanor Plantagenet , Princess of England died on 13 April 1275 at Montargis Abbey, Loiret, Orleanais/Centre, France.2,3
     She He [William Marshal] married, 2ndly, 23 April 1224, Eleanor, youngerdaughter of JOHN, King of England, by Isabel, daughter and heir of Aymer,COUNT OF ANGOULÊME (which Isabel married, 2ndly, Hugh DE LUSIGNAN, COUNTOF LA MARCHE). William died s.p., 6 April, and was buried 15 April 1231,in the Temple Church London. His widow took the veil but eventuallymarried, 2ndly, Simon (DE MONTFORT), EARL OF LEICESTER. [CompletePeerage X:365-8, XIV:521, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

-----------------

He [Simon de Montfort] m. 7 Jan 1237/8, privately, in the King's chapelin Westminster, Eleanor, 2nd daughter of King John, by Isabel, daughterand heir of Aimar, Count of Agouleme (a). She, who was b. 1215, had beenbetrothed, 23 Apr 1224, to William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke. She d. 13Apr 1275, in France, at Montargis, a cell of Fontrevault, to which sheretired after the battle of Evesham. [Complete Peerage VII:543-7]

(a) After the Earl of Pembroke's death Eleanor, with her governess Cicelyde Sanford, widow of Sir William de Gorham, had made to the Archbishop ofCanterbury a public vow of perpetual celibacy. Such a vow did not,however, constitute a canonical impediment. Soon after he marriedEleanor, Simon de Montfort went to Rome, and obtained a papl absolutionin respect of this vow. . .

Child of Eleanor Plantagenet , Princess of England and Simon VI de Montfort , 2nd Earl of Leicester

Citations

  1. [S240] Unknown author, Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on, Montfort, Simon.
  2. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VII:543-7.

William Marshal , 5th Earl of Pembroke1,2

M, b. circa 1190, d. 6 April 1231
     William Marshal , 5th Earl of Pembroke was born circa 1190 at Normandy, France.2 He married Eleanor Plantagenet , Princess of England on 23 April 1224.1 William Marshal , 5th Earl of Pembroke died on 6 April 1231 at London, Middlesex, England.1,2 He was buried on 15 April 1231 at Temple Church, London, Middlesex, England.
     He EARLDOM OF PEMBROKE (V) 1219

WILLIAM (MARSHAL), EARL OF PEMBROKE, hereditary Master Marshal, 1st sonand heir, born circa 1190, in Normandy. In 1205 his father gave him toKing John as a hostage for his loyalty, but he was released in 1212. Hejoined the baronial opposition, and in February 1214/5 he was present atthe meeting of the Barons at Stamford. In June he was elected one of the25 Barons to ensure the execution of the provisions of Magna Carta, andhe was excommunicated by the Pope on 11 December. On 9 April 1216 he hadletters of safe conduct to go to his father; but in May he was one of theBarons who joined Louis of France and did homage to him. When Louis madeAdam de Beaumont the Marshal of the army, William claimed the office ashis by hereditary right and obtained it. In July he seized Worcester forLouis, but retreated when the Earl of Chester approached. In the autumnhe deserted Louis and retired to Wales. In March 1216/7 he joined theEarl of Salisbury in a revolt at Rye against Louis, who was only saved bythe arrival of a French fleet. William and Salisbury retreated and joinedthe Marshal. With Salisbury he besieged and took the castles ofWinchester and Southampton, after which William besieged and capturedMarlborough Castle. On 20 May 1217 he fought at Lincoln. On 21 February1217/8 he was granted the profits from the money exchanges in 6 citiesfor 500 marks per annum. In May 1219 he succeeded his father in theEarldom and estates; but on 20 May 1220 he ceded the Norman lands to hisbrother Richard. In 1223 he sailed from Ireland with a large force tofight the Welsh, recaptured his castles, defeated Llewelyn and compelledhim to come to terms. On 7 November 1223 he was appointed constable ofthe castles of Carmarthen and Cardigan. From 2 May 1224 to 22 June 1226he was Justiciar of Ireland. In 1230 he accompanied the King to Brittany,and when Henry returned to England he was left to carry on the war. Hefounded the house of Friars Preachers at Kilkenny, and was a benefactorto the abbeys of Tintern and Mottisfont, the priory of Inistioge, St.Paul's Cathedral, and the hospital of St. Mary Rounceval; and heconfirmed his father's gifts to St. Thomas of Dublin.

He married, 1stly, in 1214, Alice, daughter of Baldwin DE BETHUNE, COUNTOF AUMALE, by Hawise, daughter and probably heir of William, COUNT OFAUMALE, and widow of [I] William (DE MANDEVILLE), EARL OF ESSEX, [II]William DE FORZ, both COUNTS OF AUMALE jure uxoris (see AUMALE); whichAlice died before 1221, probably circa 1216, and was buried in St. Paul'sCathedral, London. He married, 2ndly, 23 April 1224, Eleanor, youngerdaughter of JOHN, King of England, by Isabel, daughter and heir of Aymer,COUNT OF ANGOULÊME (which Isabel married, 2ndly, Hugh DE LUSIGNAN, COUNTOF LA MARCHE). William died s.p., 6 April, and was buried 15 April 1231,in the Temple Church London. His widow took the veil but eventuallymarried, 2ndly, Simon (DE MONTFORT), EARL OF LEICESTER. [CompletePeerage X:365-8, XIV:521, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

--------------------------------

William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, who, in the time of his father, was asstrenuous a supporter of the baronial cause as that nobleman was of theroyal interests, and was constituted one of the twenty-five baronsappointed to enforce the observance of Magna Carta, being then styled'Comes Mareschal, Jun.' After the decease of King John, however, he madehis peace and, becoming loyally attached to the new monarch, obtainedgrants of the forfeited lands of his former companions, Sayer de Quincy,Earl of Winchester, and David, Earl of Huntingdon. His lordship wassubsequently engaged against the Welsh and defeated their Prince,Llewelyn, with great slaughter; and in the 14th Henry III [1230], he wascaptain-general of the king's forces in Brittany. He m. 1st, Alice, dau.of Baldwin de Betun, Earl of Albemarle; and 2ndly, the Lady AlianorePlantagenet, dau. of King John, and sister of Henry III, but had issue byneither. He d. in 1231, and was s. by his next brother, Richard Marshal.[Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages,Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 358, Marshal, Earls of Pembroke] William Marshal , 5th Earl of Pembroke was also known as 05th Earl of Pembroke , William Marshal. He was Type: Bullet in 1215 at MAGNA CHARTA SURETY.

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, X:365-8.

Walter II Seigneur d' Enghien1,2

M, b. circa 1267, d. before 1310
     Walter II Seigneur d' Enghien was born circa 1267 at Enghien, Hainault, Belgium.2 He was the son of Walter I 'Le Grand' Sire d' Enghien and Marie de Rethel , Dame de Machaut. Walter II Seigneur d' Enghien married Yolanda de Flanders, daughter of Robert III Count of Flanders and Yolanda de Burgundy , Comtesse de Nevers, on 24 July 1287.2 Walter II Seigneur d' Enghien died before 1310.2

Child of Walter II Seigneur d' Enghien and Yolanda de Flanders

Citations

  1. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Dave Utzinger (UTZ), 4 Mar 2000.
  2. [S236] Unknown author, Leo's Genealogics Website (Leo van de Pas), www.genealogics.org, Wautier II Seigneur d' Enghien.

Yolanda de Flanders1,2

F, b. circa 1275, d. between January 1312 and 1313
     Yolanda de Flanders was born circa 1275 at Flanders. She was the daughter of Robert III Count of Flanders and Yolanda de Burgundy , Comtesse de Nevers. Yolanda de Flanders married Walter II Seigneur d' Enghien, son of Walter I 'Le Grand' Sire d' Enghien and Marie de Rethel , Dame de Machaut, on 24 July 1287.3 Yolanda de Flanders died between January 1312 and 1313.2

Child of Yolanda de Flanders and Walter II Seigneur d' Enghien

Citations

  1. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Dave Utzinger (UTZ), 4 Mar 2000.
  2. [S236] Unknown author, Leo's Genealogics Website (Leo van de Pas), www.genealogics.org, Yolande de Flanders.
  3. [S236] Unknown author, Leo's Genealogics Website (Leo van de Pas), www.genealogics.org, Wautier II Seigneur d' Enghien.

Catherine d' Avesnes , of Hainault

F, b. 1320, d. after 1375
     Catherine d' Avesnes , of Hainault was born circa 1315 at of, Picardy, Somme, France.1 She was born in 1320 at Hainault, Belgium. She was the daughter of William III d' Avesnes Count of Hainault and Jeanne de Valois Countess of Hainault. Catherine d' Avesnes , of Hainault married Payne de Roet, son of Payne de Roet of Guignies, circa 1347.1 Catherine d' Avesnes , of Hainault died after 1375 at Ghent, Hainault, Belgium.
     She Having checked several printed sources and the general internet forinformation on the mother of Philippa and Catherine de Roet and/or thewife of Payne de Roet, I have found nothing on her identity. The onlysources for Catherine of Hainault being that person are several WorldConnect data bases-and they do not indicate a source. That does not meanthat they are wrong.

One point in favor of a connection between the Roet's Catherine ofHainault (sister of Edward III's consort Queen Philippa) is that thePayne, Philippa, and Catherine Roet were at one time or another in QueenPhilippa's household.

Child of Catherine d' Avesnes , of Hainault and Payne de Roet

Citations

  1. [S232] Unknown author, 6 zip files containing Monarchs.ged downloaded end 1999 by Linda Neely.

Payne de Roet of Guignies

M, b. before 1274, d. after 1322
     Payne de Roet of Guignies was born before 1274 at Guignies, Hainault, Belgium. He was the son of Gilles-Rigaud de Roeulx of Guignies. Payne de Roet of Guignies married an unknown person on 12 December 1298 at Ghent, Hainault, Belgium. He died after 1322.

Child of Payne de Roet of Guignies

Richard de Beauchamp , KG, 13th Earl of Warwick1,2,3,4

M, b. between 25 January 1381 and 1382, d. 30 April 1439
     Richard de Beauchamp , KG, 13th Earl of Warwick was born between 25 January 1381 and 1382 at Salwarpe, Droitwich, Worcestershire, England.1,4 He was the son of Thomas de Beauchamp , KG, 12th Earl of Warwick and Margaret Ferrers. Richard de Beauchamp , KG, 13th Earl of Warwick married Elizabeth Baroness de Berkeley , & Lisle & Teye, daughter of Thomas 5th Baron de Berkeley , MP, Sir and Margaret Baroness de Lisle, in September 1393.5 Richard de Beauchamp , KG, 13th Earl of Warwick married Elizabeth Baroness de Berkeley , & Lisle & Teye, daughter of Thomas 5th Baron de Berkeley , MP, Sir and Margaret Baroness de Lisle, before 5 October 1397.4 Richard de Beauchamp , KG, 13th Earl of Warwick married Elizabeth Baroness de Berkeley , & Lisle & Teye, daughter of Thomas 5th Baron de Berkeley , MP, Sir and Margaret Baroness de Lisle, before May 1399.3 Richard de Beauchamp , KG, 13th Earl of Warwick married Isabel le Despenser , Baroness Burghersh on 26 November 1423.1,6,4 Richard de Beauchamp , KG, 13th Earl of Warwick died on 30 April 1439 at Rouen Castle, Seine-Maritime, France.1,4 He was buried on 4 October 1439 at Beauchamp Chapel, St Mary's, Warwickshire, England.1
     Richard de Beauchamp , KG, 13th Earl of Warwick was also known as 13th Earl of Warwick , Richard de Beauchamp. He Richard de Beauchamp (son of Thomas de Beauchamp and Margaret Ferrers),13th Earl of Warwick, KG (1403); knighted 1399; fought against OwenGlendower in Wales 1403, Capt Calais Feb 1413/4, took charge of prisonersen route to Calais Sep-Oct 1415, hence (pace Shakespeare) absent at timeof Agincourt; participated, however, in successful sea Battle of Harfleur1416; also at Sieges of Caen 1417, Caudebec 1418 and Rouen Jan 1418/9,created 19 May 1419 Count of Aumale (part of Henry V's policy of creatingEnglish nobles with French titles and fiefs in English-occupied France);undertook further Sieges of Melun 1420 and Meaux 1421, also Gamaches 1422and St Valery-sur-Somme; Capt Rouen by end of Jan 1422/3; took Pontorson,Brittany 1427; beaten by French at Battle of Montargis Sep 1427; victorover French at Beauvais 1431; appointed by Henry VI Lt and Governor ofFrance and Normandy 1437; married 1st by 5 Oct 1397 Elizabeth (dspm 28Dec 1422), Baroness Berkeley, Lisle and Teyes in her own right, onlydaughter of 5th Lord (Baron) Berkeley, and had [Margaret, Eleanor, &Elizabeth]. The 13th Earl married 2nd 26 Nov 1423 Isabel, BaronessBurghersh in her own right, widow of his cousin Richard de Beuachamp,Earl of Worcester, and sister and heir of Richard le Despenser, de jureLord (Baron) Burghersh, and died 30 April 1439 (his tomb at Warwick beingjustly famous for its beauty and splendour), leaving by her [Henry, 14thEarl of Warwick, and 1st/last Duke of Warwick, dsps 11 June 1464; andAnne]. [Burke's Peerage]

---------------------------

EARLDOM of WARWICK (XIII) 1401

RICHARD (DE BEAUCHAMP), EARL OF WARWICK, also hereditary Sheriff ofWorcestershire and Chamberlain of the Exchequer, son and heir, was born25 or 28 January 1381/2 at Salwarpe, co. Worcester, his sponsors beingRichard II and Richard le Scrope, afterwards Archbishop of York. He wasknighted, 11 October 1399, at the Coronation of Henry IV; served in Walesagainst Owen Glendower in 1402; had livery of his lands, 13 February1402/3; took part in the battle of Shrewsbury, 21 July 1403, and wasnominated K.G., probably on the following day. He was made Joint Keeper,with Lord Audley, of Brecknock Castle, 24 October 1403-19, February1403-4; was with the Prince of Wales at Worcester, June 1404; aCommissioner for the trial of Archbishop Scrope and the Earl Marshal,June 1405, receiving a grant for life of Swansea Castle and the lordshipof Gower, forfeited by the Earl Marshal, 29 August following; and was atthe siegre of Aberystwyth, September 1407. Under licence of 5 April 1408he travelled abroad for 2 years, making pilgrimages to Rome and to theHoly Land and performing notable feats of arms at Verona and elsewhere.On his return he was appointed a member of the Council, 9 May 1410, beingpresent therein, 16 June following; a Commissioner to treat with theScots, 23 May 1411; Steward of England for the Coronation of Henry V,appointed 2 April 1413, and Deputy Steward (for the Duke of Clarence) atthat of Queen Katherine, 23 February 1420/1; Commissioner to treat withBurgundy and France, 14 July 1413; Captain of Calais and Governor of theMarches of Picardy, 3 February 1413/4; joint Ambassador to the Council ofConstance and to the Emperor, 20 October 1414, and Chief Commissioner totreat with Burgundy, 7 August 1415; Chief Warden of the Marches of Walesadjoining cos. Hereford and Gloucester, 16 June 1415. Though present atthe siege of Harfleur, August-September 1415, he is said to have gone toCalais, with the Duke of Clarence, in charge of prisoners after itscapture, 22 September, and (despite Shakespeare) he did not fight atAgincourt, 24 October 1415. The following year he received the EmperorSigismund at Calais, April, and took part in the naval victory offHarfleur, 15 August 1416; Commissioner to treat with Burgundy, 5 August,and with the French Ambassadors at Calais, 31 August 1416. AccompanyingHenry V to France, July 1417, he was at the siege of Caen,August-September following, and himself besieged and captured Domfront,Apr.-July, and Caudebec, September 1418, before returning to the siege ofRouen, for whose surrender, 19 January 1418/9, he was appointed ChiefCommissioner. He was made Captain of Beauvais, 2 February 1418/9, andforced La Roche Guyon to capitulate after a 2 months' siege, 1 Mayfollowing. On 19 May 1419, while the King was at Vernon, he received agrant of the comté of Aumale, with remainder to the heirs male of hisbody, whereby he became COUNT OF AUMALE, in Normandy. For the next yearhe was continually employed in the negotiations for a truce which led tothe treaty of Troyes, 21 May, and the marriage of Henry V to Katherine ofFrance, 2 June 1420. Later he took part in the sieges of Melun,July-November 1420, and Meaux, October 1421, for whose surrender, 10 May1422, he was a Commissioner. Keeper for life of Moulton Park, co.Northampton, 20 December 1421. He himself besieged and forced thesurrender of Gamaches, 12 June 1422, and St. Valéry-sur-Somme, 4September following, and he was present at the death-bed of Henry V,30-31 August 1422, to whom he was an executor. Under Henry VI he waspresent in Council, 5 November, and was made a Councillor of Regency, 9December 1422; Captain of Rouen, before 31 January 1422/3, and again ofCalais, 10 July (as from 4 February) 1423 and 1 March 1424/5; jointGuardian of the truce with Scotland, 28 March 1424, and again in 1426 and1430. As Captain and Lieutenant General of the King and the Regent in thefield, 1426-27, he besieged and captured Pontorson, in Brittany,January-May 1427, but, with the Earl of Suffolk) was completely defeatedby the Bastard of Orleans before Montargis, 5 September following. From 1June 1428 till 19 May 1436 he was Tutor and Governor to the young King,whom he bore to Westminster Abbey for his Coronation, 6 November 1429,and whom he accompanied to France, April, for his Coronation in NotreDame, Paris, 16 December 1430. Captain of Meaux before 1 November 1430.He defeated the French in a notable skirmish near Beauvais 11 August1431; was Lieutenant in the field in the absence of the Regent, 1435; andaccompanied the Duke of Gloucester in his foray into Flanders fromCalais, August 1436. Ranger of Wychwood Forest, 21 November 1433;Constable of Bristol, 11 July 1437. He was, 16 July 1437, made LieutenantGeneral and Governor of France and Normandy, setting sail thereto, 29August, where, within 2 years' time, he died, his position being one ofgreat peril and anxiety.

He married, 1stly (covenant September 1392), before 5 October 1397,Elizabeth, de jure suo jure (according to modern doctrine) BARONESSBERKELEY, also BARONESS LISLE (of Kingston Lisle) and BARONESS TEYES,only daughter and heir of Thomas (DE BERKELEY), 5th LORD BERKELEY, byMargaret, de jure suo jure (according to modern doctrine) BARONESS LISLE(of Kingston Lisle) and BARONESS TEYES, only daughter and heir of Warin(DE LISLE), 2nd LORD LISLE (of Kingston Lisle) and LORD TEYES. She, whowas under 7 in 1392, died s.p.m. 18 December 1422 and was buried inKingswood Abbey, co. Gloucester. M.I. On her death the Baronies ofBerkeley, Lisle and Teyes fell, according to modern doctrine, intoabeyance between her 3 daughters and coheirs. He married, 2ndly, 26November 1423, at Hanley Castle, co. Worcester, Isabel, de jure suo jure(according to modern doctrine) BARONESS BURGHERSH, widow of his cousinRichard (DE BEAUCHAMP), EARL OF WORCESTER (who died s.p.m. March 1422),sister and heir of Richard (LE DESPENSER), de jure LORD BURGHERSH (whodied s.p. 7 October 1414), posthumous daughter and eventually sole heirof Thomas (LE DESPENSER), EARL OF GLOUCESTER and LORD LE DESPENSER (whowas beheaded, January 1399/1400, and afterwards attainted] by Constance,daughter of Edmund, 'of Langley,' DUKE OF YORK, 5th son of EDWARD III. Hedied 30 April 1439 at Rouen, aged 57, and was buried 4 October in St.Mary's, Warwick, being afterwards removed to the Lady Chapel (built byhis executors), where is a superb monument to him. His widow, who wasborn 26 July 1400 at Cardiff, died 27 December 1439 at the FriarsMinoresses, London, and was buried 13 January 1439/40 in TewkesburyAbbey, aged 39. M.I. [Complete Peerage XII/2:378-82, (transcribed byDave Utzinger)]

Child of Richard de Beauchamp , KG, 13th Earl of Warwick and Elizabeth Baroness de Berkeley , & Lisle & Teye

Child of Richard de Beauchamp , KG, 13th Earl of Warwick and Isabel le Despenser , Baroness Burghersh

Citations

  1. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.
  2. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 80-9.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VIII:54-5.
  4. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/2:378-82.
  5. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.
  6. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, I:26-27.

Humphrey de Beauchamp , of Ryme, Sir1

M, b. BEF MAR 1252/53, d. 18 July 1317
     Humphrey de Beauchamp , of Ryme, Sir was born BEF MAR 1252/53 at Ryme Intrinseca, Sherborne, Dorset, England.1 He was the son of Robert V de Beauchamp , Lord of Hache and Alice de Mohun. Humphrey de Beauchamp , of Ryme, Sir married Sibyl Oliver, daughter of Walter Oliver , Lord of Wambrook, before 1274.1 Humphrey de Beauchamp , of Ryme, Sir married Alice de Orreby after 10 August 1300.1 Humphrey de Beauchamp , of Ryme, Sir died on 18 July 1317 at Silferton Manor, Devonshire, England.1
     He Sir Humphrey de Beauchamp, Knt., younger son, b. by Mar 1253 (adult by1274), apparently living 1316, dead 1317, lord of Ryme Intrinseca, Dorset& Oburnford, Oulescombe, Teinghervy, & Buckerell, co. Devon; m. (1) by1254 Sibyl Oliver, living 1306, daughter & heir of Walter Oliver, lord ofWambrook, Somerset, from whom divorced between 1287 & 1290; m. (2) after10 Aug 1300 Alice, d. shortly bef. 20 Oct 1317, widow of Peter Corbet.With Alice, Sir Humphrey held the manor of Silferton, co. Devon in dowerfor the term of their lives. [Ancestral Roots]

Note: I think the marriage date of 'by 1254' is an error. One year oldmarriages are pretty early, even for that day and age.

Child of Humphrey de Beauchamp , of Ryme, Sir and Sibyl Oliver

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.

Sibyl Oliver1

F, b. circa 1260, d. after 1306
     Sibyl Oliver was born circa 1260 at Wambrook, Somerset, England. She was the daughter of Walter Oliver , Lord of Wambrook. Sibyl Oliver married Humphrey de Beauchamp , of Ryme, Sir, son of Robert V de Beauchamp , Lord of Hache and Alice de Mohun, before 1274.1 Sibyl Oliver died after 1306.1

Child of Sibyl Oliver and Humphrey de Beauchamp , of Ryme, Sir

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.

Walter Oliver , Lord of Wambrook1

M, b. circa 1230
     Walter Oliver , Lord of Wambrook was born circa 1230 at Wambrook, Somerset, England. He was the son of Jordan Oliver , Lord of Wambrook.

Child of Walter Oliver , Lord of Wambrook

Citations

  1. [S234] Frederick Lewis Weis additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition.

Jordan Oliver , Lord of Wambrook

M, b. circa 1200
     Jordan Oliver , Lord of Wambrook was born circa 1200 at Wambrook, Somerset, England.

Child of Jordan Oliver , Lord of Wambrook

Edmund Plantagenet KG, 1st Duke of York1,2

M, b. 5 June 1341, d. 1 August 1402
     Edmund Plantagenet KG, 1st Duke of York was buried at Church of Dominicans, Langley, Hertfordshire, England. He was born on 5 June 1341 at King's Langley, Hertfordshire, England.3,2 He was the son of Edward III Plantagenet King of England and Philippa d' Avesnes , of Hainault. Edmund Plantagenet KG, 1st Duke of York married Isabel Perez Princess of Castile & Leon, daughter of Pedro I 'Crudelis'['the Cruel'] Alfonsez and Maria Juana de Padilla, circa 1 March 1372 at Hertford.4 Edmund Plantagenet KG, 1st Duke of York married an unknown person before 4 November 1393.4,5,6,7 He died on 1 August 1402 at King's Langley, Hertfordshire, England, at age 61.3,2
     He Edmund of Langley, 1st duke of York, also called (1362-85) EARL OFCAMBRIDGE (b. June 5, 1341, King's Langley, Hertfordshire, Eng.--d. Aug.1, 1402, King's Langley), fourth surviving legitimate son of King EdwardIII of England and founder of the House of York as a branch of thePlantagenet dynasty.

Created earl of Cambridge in 1362 and duke of York in 1385, Edmund wasthe least able of Edward III's sons, and in the political strife ofRichard II's reign he played an ineffective part. Between 1359 and 1378he served without distinction in several campaigns in France, Spain, andBrittany, and his one independent command, the Lisbon expedition of1381-82 to aid King Ferdinand of Portugal against Castile, was a failure.York was appointed keeper of the realm during Richard II's absence inIreland in 1394-95, and again on the King's departure for his secondIrish expedition in May 1399. When Henry of Lancaster (afterward KingHenry IV) invaded England (July), York tried to organize resistance, buthe soon submitted (July 27), recognizing that Richard's cause was lost.[Encyclopædia Britannica CD '97]

-------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----------

EARLDOM OF CAMBRIDGE (II, 1)

DUKEDOM OF YORK (I)

EDMUND, 'of Langley,' 5th but 4th surviving son of EDWARD III, byPhilippe, daughter of William, COUNT OF HOLLAND AND HAINAULT, was born 5June 1341 at King's Langley, Herts, and baptised there by Michael, Abbotof St. Albans. On 6 August 1347 he was granted all the lands beyond Trentlate of his godfather, the Earl of Surrey. He took part in his father'scampaign in France, 1359-60, and witnessed the final form of the Treatyof Brétigny at Calais, 24 October 1360; nominated K.G. in or shortlybefore April 1361. He was created, 13 November 1362, in full Parliament,EARL OF CAMBRIDGE. Having landed with the Earl of Pembroke at St. Malo,in Brittany, in 1369, the two Earls joined the Prince of Wales atAngouléme, whence they were sent to besiege Bourdeilles andRoche-sur-Yon, both of which were captured. The following year he wentwith Pembroke to relieve Belleperche, was at the relief of Bergerac anddistinguished himself under the Black Prince at the siege and sack ofLimoges, September 1370. He was with the Duke of Lancaster at the siegeof Montpont-sur-I'Isle, January-February 1370/1, but later in that yearwas recalled to England. In August-October 1372 he sailed with the King'sabortive expedition to relieve Thouars; and he was granted for life, 23April 1373, the manor and lordship of Wark, in Tynedale. As the King'sLieutenant, with the Duke of Brittany, in France and Brittany, appointed24 November 1374, he captured St. Mathieu and St. Pol de Uon and laidsiege to St. Brieuc in 1375. He was a Commissioner to treat for peacewith France, 20 September 1375; Constable of Dover Castle and Warden ofthe Cinque Ports, 12 June 1376-1 February 1380/1; was granted, with hiswife Isabel, the castles of Fotheringhay, Northants, and Anstey, Herts,25 May 1377; Chief Commissioner for the defence of the Kentish coastagainst the French, 30 June 1377. At the Coronation of Richard II, 16July 1377, he bore the Sceptre with the Dove. He took part in his brotherLancaster's unsuccessful expedition against St. Malo in 1378; was ChiefCommissioner to treat with the ambassadors of Bohemia concerning theKing's marriage, 29 March 1381; and commanded the English troops inPortugal against the Spaniards without much fighting or success, 1381-82.While accompanying the King on his only expedition into Scotland, he wascreated, 6 August 1385, at Hoselaw, in Teviotdale, DUKE OF YORK, and wasinvested therewith, 20 October following, in Parliament, then sitting atWestminster. For the support of the Dukedom he received a grant of £1,000a year, 15 November 1385, with remainder to his heirs male. Justice ofChester and co. Flint, 28 September 1385.

On 19 November 1386 he was one of the 14 Commissioners appointed toreceive the Crown revenues for one year, who formed the Council ofRegency. Keeper of the bailiwick of the forests of Rutland andLeighfield, 4 May 1388, and (in reversion) of Hadleigh Castle, Essex, 9February 1390/1; Commissioner, with Lancaster, to treat for peace withFrance, 10 March 1393/4. During the King's absence from England he wasthree times Regent, viz., 29 September 1394-May 1395, 6 August and 27Sepyember-November 1396, and May-August 1399. Surveyor of thetemporalities of the Archbishop of Canterbury, 5 August 1396; Keeper ofMortagne-sur-la-Gironde, 24 February 1396/7, and of Freemantle Park,Hants, 12 May 1397. Though he had licence, 28 August 1397, to come toParliament with 100 men-at-arms and 200 archers for the comfort of theKing, he had no part in Gloucester's death in that year. Steward ofEngland, 20 March-August 1399. As Regent, while the King was in Ireland,he prepared to oppose the landing, in 1399, of his nephew, afterwardsHenry IV, but made his peace with him at Berkeley, 27 July. By the newKing, to whom he was P.C., he was made Master of the royal mews andfalcons, with a grant of the lordship of the Isle of Axholme, Lincs, 10October 1399.

He married, 1stly, between 1 January and 30 April 1372, it is said atHertford Castle, Isabel, sister of (his sister-in-law) Constance, DUCHESSOF LANCASTER, younger surviving daughter and coheir of PEDRO THE CRUEL,KING OF CASTILE AND LEON (1350-69), by his mistress, Maria DE PADILLA.She died 23 December 1392, aged about 37, and was buried 14 January1392/3 in the church of the Dominicans at Langley. Will dated 6 October1392 proved 6 January 1392/3. He married, 2ndly, Joan, sister and coheirof Edmund (DE HOLAND), 4th EARL OF KENT, daughter of Thomas, 2nd EARL OFKENT, by Alice, daughter of Richard (FITZALAN), 10th or 3rd EARL OFARUNDEL. He died 1 August 1402 at Langley, aged 61, and was buried therewith his 1st wife. Will dated 25 November 1400, proved at Lambeth, 6October 1402. His widow married, before 9 August 1404, as his 2nd wife,William (DE WILLOUGHBY), 5th LORD WILLOUGHBY, who died 4 December 1409,She married, 3rdly (licence 6 September 1410, to marry in the chapel ofFaxflete, co. York), as his 2nd wife, Henry (LE SCROPE), 3rd LORD SCROPE(of Masham), who died s.p. 5 August 1415, being beheaded at Southampton.She married, 4thly, between Michaelmas 1415 and 27 April 1416 (pardon formarrying without licence, 14 August following, as his 1st wife, Henry(BROMFLETE), LORD VESSY, who died s.p.m. 16 January 1468/9. She, who wassaid to be aged 36 in 1416, died s.p. 12 April 1434. [Complete PeerageXII/2:895-9, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)] He Name Suffix: 1st Duke York,K.G.,Earl Cambridge
GEDCOM provided by Carolyn Proffitt Winch BIRTH:HOUSE OF LANCASTER & YORK

TITLE: Prince of England; Duke of York

SOURCE: The Lives of the Kings and Queens of England by Antonia Fraserp.
70-71;142-3.

per I, ELIZABETH by Rosalind Miles
Information provided by Randy Winch <gumby@@cafes.net>FromAncestral File (TM), data as of 5 JAN 1998.SOURCE NOTES:
Hines, D. Spencer, Edward of WarsickAhnenreihe, posting toGEN-MEDIEVAL
4/26/97. Author address shines@@worldnet.att.net.

Louda, Jiri, and Michael MacLagan, Heraldry of The Royal Families ofEurope.
New York: Clarkson Potter, 1981. Morris County Library 929.6094.

Paget, Gerald, The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles,Prince of
Wales. London: Charles Skilton Ltd, 1977. Nypl ARF+ 78-835.

Previte-Orton, C. W., The Shorter Cambridge Medieval History,Cambridge:
University Press, 1952.Chatham 940.1PRE.

Redlich, Marcellus Donald R Von, Pedigrees of Some of theEmperor
Charlemagne's Descendants. Order of the Crown of Charlemagne, 1941.

Schwennicke, Detlev, ed., Europaische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zurGeschichte
der europaischen Staaten, New Series, Marburg: J.A. Stargardt, 1978-.

Wagner, Anthony, Pedigree and Progress, Essays in the Genealogical
Interpretation of History, London, Philmore, 1975. Rutgers AlexCS4.W33.

Watney, Vernon James, The Wallop Family and their Ancestry,Oxford:John
Johnson, 1928. LDS Film#1696491 items 6-9.

Weis, Frederick L, Magna Charta Sureties 1215: The BaronsNamed in theMagna
Charta and Some of Their Descendants. 4th Ed. Baltimore: Gen Pub Co,1991.

Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists, 6thEdition,
Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1988. Data not yet checkedagainst 7th
Edition.

RESEARCH NOTES:
Earl of Cambridge, Duke of York, K.G [Ref: Redlich CharlemagneDescp65, Weis AR #225]
Duke of York, K.G. [Ref: Weis MC #161]

Nov 13 1362: created Earl of Cambridge [Ref: Paget HRHCharles p24]
Aug 8 1385: Duke of York [Ref: Paget HRHCharles p24]From AncestralFile (TM), data as of 5 JAN 1998. [daddy5.FTW]

[daddy3.FTW]

[daddy2.FTW]

Ancestral File Number: 8XHQ-N7@@S1298@@
Ancestral File Number: ES:II-84, MC:161-17
REFN: 8XHQ-N7@@S759@@@@S759@@@@S759@@@@S759@@
REFN: 3591.

Child of Edmund Plantagenet KG, 1st Duke of York and Isabel Perez Princess of Castile & Leon

Citations

  1. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 161-17, 47-8.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/2:895-899.
  3. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 161-17.
  4. [S242] Alice Beard, GEDCOM 'Royals of Europe' imported 7 NOV 1999 by Linda Joyce Neely.
  5. [S232] Unknown author, 6 zip files containing Monarchs.ged downloaded end 1999 by Linda Neely.
  6. [S259] Unknown author, winch.
  7. [S248] Unknown author, gedcom imported SEP 2002.

Elizabeth Baroness Latimer , of Corby1,2,3

F, b. between 1355 and 1357, d. 5 November 1395
     Elizabeth Baroness Latimer , of Corby was buried at Guisborough Priory, North Riding Yorkshire, England. She was born between 1355 and 1357 at Scrampston, Yorkshire, England.3 She married John 3rd Baron de Neville , of Raby, KG, Sir, son of Ralph Neville 2nd Baron Neville Of Raby and Baroness Alice de Audley, before 9 October 1381.1,3 Elizabeth Baroness Latimer , of Corby married an unknown person after October 1391.1,2 She died on 5 November 1395 at Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England.1,2,3
     She Elizabeth Latimer, Baroness Latimer (of Corby) in her own right (married2nd, as his 3rd wife, 4th Lord (Baron) Willoughby de Eresby and died 5Nov 1395), daughter and heiress of 4th Lord (Baron) Latimer (of Corby) ofthe Feb 1298/9 creation. [Burke's Peerage]

--------------------

BARONY OF LATIMER [OF CORBY] (V)

ELIZABETH LATIMER, according to modern doctrine suo jure BARONESSLATIMER, daughter and heir. According to her father's Inquisition postmortem she was aged 24 or 26 in 1381, and 27 or 29 according to that ofher grandmother in 1384. She married, 1stly, on or before 9 October 1381,as 2nd wife, Sir John (DE NEVILL), LORD NEVILL, of Raby. On 12 July 1384John de Nevill of Raby and Elizabeth his wife, daughter and heir ofWilliam de Latymere, son and heir of William de Latymere knight, theelder, had livery of the manor of Helpringham and other lands held indower by Elizabeth, widow of the elder William, lately deceased. LordNevill died 17 October 1388, leaving by Elizabeth his wife a son John anda daughter Elizabeth. His widow had assignment of dower 9 November 1388,as well as livery of her father's lands, held by her late husband in herright. She married, 2ndly, as 3rd wife, Sir Robert (DE WILLOUGHBY), LORDWILLOUGHBY, of Eresby. She died 5 November 1395, and was buried atGuisborough. On 21 January 1395/6 the escheator in Yorks was ordered todeliver to Ralph, son and heir of John de Nevill of Raby, knight, seisinof various lands, &c., held in dower by Elizabeth his widow, deceased,late wife of Robert de Wylughby, knight and on 14 February was ordered totake the fealty of the said Robert and give him livery of the manor ofDanby, &c., pertaining to him by the courtesy of England afterElizabeth's death. Lord Willoughby died 9 August 1396, holdingIselhampstead, Bucks, and some other estates in right of his late wife.[Complete Peerage VII:475-6, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

--------------------

He [Robert de Willoughby] married, 3rdly, Elizabeth, de jure suo jure(according to modern doctrine) BARONESS LATIMER, widow of John (DENEVILLE), 3rd LORD NEVILLE (of Raby), daughter and heir of William (LELATIMER), 4th LORD LATIMER, by his wife Elizabeth. She died 5 November1395 and was probably buried at Spilsby (h). Will dated 18 October atEresby, directing burial at Spilsby, proved 10 November 1395 at Lincoln.He died 9 August 1396 and was buried at Spilsby. [Complete PeerageXII/2:660-1, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

(h) The statement that she was buried at Guisborough, co. York, is basedon an obit, giving her date of death, taken from a Guisborough Priorycalendar. There is, however, no mention of her burial there in a list ofGuisborough, sepulcures, and it is far more likely that she was buried,in accordance with her will, at Spilsby, where her effigy appears on her2nd husband's tomb.

Citations

  1. [S233] Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XII/2:660-1.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, VII:475-6.

Richard Wydeville , 1st Earl Rivers1,2,3,4

M, b. circa 1405, d. 12 August 1469
     Richard Wydeville , 1st Earl Rivers married Jacquette de Luxembourg, daughter of Pierre I de Luxembourg , Comte de St Pol and Marguerite del Balzo, BEF 23 MAR 1436/37.3,5 Richard Wydeville , 1st Earl Rivers was born circa 1405 at Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire, England. He was the son of Richard Wydeville , of La Mote & Grafton, Sir and Joan Bittelsgate. Richard Wydeville , 1st Earl Rivers died on 12 August 1469 at Executed after Battle of Edgecot, Buckinghamshire, England.3,6
     He Richard Woodville. d. 1469, English nobleman. He was knighted (1426) byHenry VI and acquired wealth and power by marrying (c.1436) Jacquetta ofLuxemburg, widow of John of Lancaster, duke of Bedford. He served in thewars in France and helped suppress the rebellion (1450) of Jack Cade inEngland. In the Wars of the Roses, Rivers fought for Henry VI until theLancastrian defeat at Towton (1461). He then transferred his loyalty tothe Yorkist Edward IV, to whom he gave his daughter (see Woodville,Elizabeth) in marriage in 1464. He and his family soon received extensiveroyal favors, Rivers himself becoming treasurer and then constable (1467)of England. He was created earl in 1466. The favoritism shown theWoodville faction embittered Richard Neville, earl of Warwick, whorebelled in 1469. Rivers was captured and executed after Edward’s defeatat Edgecot, [Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th Edition, 2001 - online]

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EARLDOM OF RIVERS (I)

RICHARD WYDEVILL, son and heir, was one of those knighted at Leicester,on Palm Sunday, 19 May 1426, by Henry VI. He was retained to serve theKing in the war in France, 11 April 1433. In 1435 he was a knightbachelor in the Regent's court, and is said to have been captured by theFrench, when the English, under the Earl of Arundel, besieged Gerberoy.He was in the Earl of Suffolk's retinue in France in 1436; in 1437, chiefrider in Salsey Forest. He was with the Earl of Somerset in 1439, andtook part in the attempt to relieve Meaux. In November 1440, in lists atSmithfield, he represented England against the challenge of Pedro deVasquez, a Spanish knight. In February 1440/1, a commis sioner forcollection of a subsidy in Northants; in July he was again going toFrance. Truce was made in 1443, lasting till 1449. In 1444 he and hiswife were in the escort of Margaret of Anjou, coming to England for hermarriage. J.P. Northants, 1445 till his death. In 1446 he went twice toCalais on the King's business. As the King's knight he was created, 9 May1448, BARON and LORD DE RYVERS, in tail male (d). Between 1449 and 1459he was constantly employed, when in England, upon various commissions. InMay 1450 there was at any rate a report that he was made Constable ofEngland; in June he was one of the leaders against Cade and the Kentishrebels; K.G., 4 August, and in that month P.C. In October 1450 appointedSeneschal of Aquitaine. With a number of other government officials andmembers of the King's household, he was indicted in Kent in August 1451.In 1454 and 1455 he was joint deputy of the Duke of Somerset asLieutenant of Calais. Keeper of Rochester Castle for life, November 1457.One of the barons summoned to the Great Council held at Westminster,January 1457/8. On the outbreak of civil war, he was naturally a staunchsupporter of the King. Having been ordered to proceed to Calais againstthe Earl of Warwick, he was captured by surprise at Sandwich by Warwick'smen, January 1459/60, with his wife and eldest son. They were keptprisoners in Normandy, probably till June 1460. On 29 March 1461 he wastaken prisoner at Towton, but soon afterwards he obtained a generalpardon from Edward IV. He took part in Edward's expedition to Scotland in1462, and from 1463 till his death was a member of numerous commissions.In May 1464 the King married his daughter Elizabeth. On 4 March 1465/6 hewas appointed Treasurer of England during pleasure. On 24 May 1466 he wascreated EARL OF RYVERS. Constable of England for life, 24 August 1467,with remainder to his son Anthony. The resentment aroused by the favoursshowered on an upstart and unpopular family resulted in a rising, andLord Rivers retired with his son Sir John to Chepstow. After the Yorkistdefeat at Edgecote, Northants, they were given up to the Earl of Warwick,and executed without trial.

He married, before 23 March 1436/7, Jacquette, widow of John, DUKE OFBEDFORD (died 14 September 1435), daughter of Pierre DE LUXEMBOURG, COUNTOF ST. POL. He died, as above, 12 Aug. 1469. His widow died 30 May 1472.[Complete Peerage XI:19-22, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

(d) . . . To sustain the dignity Wydevill was granted the reversion of arent of 14 l, 4, s due from the fee of Chokes to the ward of Northamptoncastle, and all fees belonging to 'Chokesfee, Bryansfe, feoda Johannis deBaiocis, Maundevyllfee, Loxingtonfee,' or the baronies (sic) of Rivers(Ripariis) and Ledet fee. The reason for the choice of the title ofRivers is undoubtedly due to a claimed descent from the Rivers [Reviers],Earls of Devon, as is shown from the arms used by the Earls. [XI:20 note(d) as corrected by XIV:549] Richard Wydeville , 1st Earl Rivers was also known as Richard Woodville , 1st Earl Rivers.

Child of Richard Wydeville , 1st Earl Rivers and Jacquette de Luxembourg

Citations

  1. [S239] Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 161-20.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, IV:208, VII:489.
  3. [S270] William Henry Turton, The Plantagenet Ancestry, 3.
  4. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XI:19-22.
  5. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XI:21-2.
  6. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XI;19-22.

Jacquette de Luxembourg1,2,3

F, b. 1415, d. 30 May 1472
     Jacquette de Luxembourg married Richard Wydeville , 1st Earl Rivers, son of Richard Wydeville , of La Mote & Grafton, Sir and Joan Bittelsgate, BEF 23 MAR 1436/37.1,2 Jacquette de Luxembourg was born in 1415 at St Pol, Artois/Pas-de-Calais, France.1,3 She was the daughter of Pierre I de Luxembourg , Comte de St Pol and Marguerite del Balzo. Jacquette de Luxembourg married John Plantagenet , 1st Duke of Bedford on 20 April 1433.3 Jacquette de Luxembourg died on 30 May 1472.1,2
     She He [Richard Wydevill] married, before 23 March 1436/7, Jacquette, widowof John, DUKE OF BEDFORD (died 14 September 1435), daughter of Pierre DELUXEMBOURG, COUNT OF ST. POL. He died, as above, 12 Aug. 1469. His widowdied 30 May 1472. [Complete Peerage XI:19-22, (transcribed by DaveUtzinger)]

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He [John, Duke of Bedford] married, 2ndly, 20 April 1433, at Therouenne,Jacquette, or Jacqueline, daughter of Pierre DE LUXEMBOURG COUNT OF ST.POL, by Marguerite, daughter of Francesco del Balzo, DUKE OF ANDRIA inApulia, she being then aged about 17. He died s.p.s., 15 September 1435,at his residence, ' Joyeux Repos,' at Rouen, aged 46, when all hishonours became extinct. He was buried at Rouen. M.I. His widow in(1435-36), was one of the Ladies for whom robes of the Order of theGarter were provided. She married, between 6 February 1435/6 and 23 March1436/7, when she had pardon for marriage without license, Sir RichardWIDVILLE, afterwards EARL RIVERS (beheaded 1469), and died his widow, 30May 1472, having lived ten years after her daughter Elizabeth had becomeQueen Consort to Edward IV. [Complete Peerage II:70-72, (transcribed byDave Utzinger)]

Child of Jacquette de Luxembourg and Richard Wydeville , 1st Earl Rivers

Citations

  1. [S270] William Henry Turton, The Plantagenet Ancestry, 3.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, XI:21-2.
  3. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, II:72.

Pierre I de Luxembourg , Comte de St Pol1,2

M, b. 1390, d. 31 August 1433
     Pierre I de Luxembourg , Comte de St Pol was born in 1390 at Naples, Italy.3 He was the son of Jean II de Luxembourg , Sire de Beauvoir and Marguerite d' Enghien , Comtesse de Brienne. Pierre I de Luxembourg , Comte de St Pol married Marguerite del Balzo, daughter of Francesco del Balzo , Duke d'Andria and Justine (Sueva) des Ursins, on 8 May 1405.1 Pierre I de Luxembourg , Comte de St Pol died on 31 August 1433 at Chateau Rambures, Oisemont, France.1

Child of Pierre I de Luxembourg , Comte de St Pol and Marguerite del Balzo

Citations

  1. [S270] William Henry Turton, The Plantagenet Ancestry, 3.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, II:72.
  3. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Dave Utzinger (UTZ), 4 Mar 2000.

Marguerite del Balzo1,2

F, b. 1394, d. 15 November 1469
     Marguerite del Balzo was born in 1394 at Andria, Apulia, Italy.1 She was the daughter of Francesco del Balzo , Duke d'Andria and Justine (Sueva) des Ursins. Marguerite del Balzo married Pierre I de Luxembourg , Comte de St Pol, son of Jean II de Luxembourg , Sire de Beauvoir and Marguerite d' Enghien , Comtesse de Brienne, on 8 May 1405.1 Marguerite del Balzo died on 15 November 1469.1,3
     Marguerite del Balzo was also known as Marguerite de Baux.

Child of Marguerite del Balzo and Pierre I de Luxembourg , Comte de St Pol

Citations

  1. [S270] William Henry Turton, The Plantagenet Ancestry, 3.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, II:72.
  3. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Dave Utzinger (UTZ), 4 Mar 2000.

Francesco del Balzo , Duke d'Andria1,2

M, b. circa 1329, d. 23 April 1422
     Francesco del Balzo , Duke d'Andria was born circa 1329 at Andria, Apulia, Italy.3 He was the son of Bertrand de Baux , 3rd Comte d'Andria and Marguerite d' Aulnay. Francesco del Balzo , Duke d'Andria married Justine (Sueva) des Ursins, daughter of Niccolo Orsini , Conte di Nola and Jeanne (Gorizia) de Sabran, in 1381.1 Francesco del Balzo , Duke d'Andria died in 1404.1 He died on 23 April 1422 at Church of Andria, Apulia, Italy.3
     Francesco del Balzo , Duke d'Andria was also known as Francois de Baux , Duke d'Andria.

Child of Francesco del Balzo , Duke d'Andria and Justine (Sueva) des Ursins

Citations

  1. [S270] William Henry Turton, The Plantagenet Ancestry, 3.
  2. [S269] G. E Cokayne, Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, II:72.
  3. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Dave Utzinger (UTZ), 4 Mar 2000.

Justine (Sueva) des Ursins1

F, b. circa 1360, d. after 1422
     Justine (Sueva) des Ursins was born circa 1360 at Nola, Naples, Italy. She was the daughter of Niccolo Orsini , Conte di Nola and Jeanne (Gorizia) de Sabran. Justine (Sueva) des Ursins married Francesco del Balzo , Duke d'Andria, son of Bertrand de Baux , 3rd Comte d'Andria and Marguerite d' Aulnay, in 1381.1 Justine (Sueva) des Ursins died after 1422.2
     Justine (Sueva) des Ursins was also known as Giustina degli Orsini-Nola.

Child of Justine (Sueva) des Ursins and Francesco del Balzo , Duke d'Andria

Citations

  1. [S270] William Henry Turton, The Plantagenet Ancestry, 3.
  2. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Dave Utzinger (UTZ), 4 Mar 2000.

Niccolo Orsini , Conte di Nola1,2

M, b. 27 August 1331, d. between 14 February 1398 and 1399
     Niccolo Orsini , Conte di Nola married Jeanne (Gorizia) de Sabran, daughter of Guillaume de Sabran , Conte di Ariano and Francesca di Celano.3 Niccolo Orsini , Conte di Nola was born on 27 August 1331 at Nola, Naples, Italy.1,2 He was the son of Roberto Orsini , Conte di Nola and Sueva de Baux. Niccolo Orsini , Conte di Nola died between 14 February 1398 and 1399.1,4
     He Senator of Rome 1358. [Turton] Niccolo Orsini , Conte di Nola was also known as Nicholas des Ursins , Conte Nola, Roman Senator.

Child of Niccolo Orsini , Conte di Nola and Jeanne (Gorizia) de Sabran

Citations

  1. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Dave Utzinger (UTZ), 4 Mar 2000.
  2. [S270] William Henry Turton, The Plantagenet Ancestry, 224.
  3. [S270] William Henry Turton, The Plantagenet Ancestry, 224-225.
  4. [S270] William Henry Turton, The Plantagenet Ancestry, 1399.

Jeanne (Gorizia) de Sabran1,2

F, b. circa 1335, d. after 1378
     Jeanne (Gorizia) de Sabran married Niccolo Orsini , Conte di Nola, son of Roberto Orsini , Conte di Nola and Sueva de Baux.3 Jeanne (Gorizia) de Sabran was born circa 1335 at Ariano, Naples, Italy. She was the daughter of Guillaume de Sabran , Conte di Ariano and Francesca di Celano. Jeanne (Gorizia) de Sabran died after 1378.1,2

Child of Jeanne (Gorizia) de Sabran and Niccolo Orsini , Conte di Nola

Citations

  1. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Dave Utzinger (UTZ), 4 Mar 2000.
  2. [S270] William Henry Turton, The Plantagenet Ancestry, 225.
  3. [S270] William Henry Turton, The Plantagenet Ancestry, 224-225.

Guillaume de Sabran , Conte di Ariano1

M, b. circa 1300, d. 8 October 1353
     Guillaume de Sabran , Conte di Ariano was born circa 1300 at Ariano, Naples, Italy. He was the son of Ermengaud II de Sabran , Conte di Ariano and Alix des Baux. Guillaume de Sabran , Conte di Ariano married Francesca di Celano, daughter of Tomasso Conte di Celano and Isabella di Aquaviva, before 20 June 1323.1 Guillaume de Sabran , Conte di Ariano died on 8 October 1353.1

Child of Guillaume de Sabran , Conte di Ariano and Francesca di Celano

Citations

  1. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Dave Utzinger (UTZ), 4 Mar 2000.

Francesca di Celano1

F, b. circa 1310, d. before 7 April 1379
     Francesca di Celano was born circa 1310 at Celano, Rome, Italy. She was the daughter of Tomasso Conte di Celano and Isabella di Aquaviva. Francesca di Celano married Guillaume de Sabran , Conte di Ariano, son of Ermengaud II de Sabran , Conte di Ariano and Alix des Baux, before 20 June 1323.1 Francesca di Celano died before 7 April 1379.1

Child of Francesca di Celano and Guillaume de Sabran , Conte di Ariano

Citations

  1. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Dave Utzinger (UTZ), 4 Mar 2000.

Tomasso Conte di Celano1

M, b. circa 1280
     Tomasso Conte di Celano was born circa 1280 at Celano, Rome, Italy.2 He was the son of Ruggero (Roger) Conte di Celano and Maria di Aquino.

Child of Tomasso Conte di Celano and Isabella di Aquaviva

Citations

  1. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Dave Utzinger (UTZ), 4 Mar 2000.
  2. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Richard Borthwick, 22 Jul 2000.

Isabella di Aquaviva1

F, b. circa 1285
     Isabella di Aquaviva was born circa 1285 at Italy. She was the daughter of Matteo di Aquaviva and Imperatrice d' Arce.

Child of Isabella di Aquaviva and Tomasso Conte di Celano

Citations

  1. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Dave Utzinger (UTZ), 4 Mar 2000.

Matteo di Aquaviva1

M, b. 1255, d. 1303
     Matteo di Aquaviva was born in 1255 at Italy. He was the son of Gaultieri di Aquaviva and Isabella di Bellante. Matteo di Aquaviva died in 1303 at Teramo, Italy.1

Child of Matteo di Aquaviva and Imperatrice d' Arce

Citations

  1. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Richard Borthwick, 22 Jul 2000.

Imperatrice d' Arce1

F, b. circa 1260, d. after 1309
     Imperatrice d' Arce was born circa 1260 at Italy. She was the daughter of Campli Seigneur d' Arce. Imperatrice d' Arce died after 1309.1

Child of Imperatrice d' Arce and Matteo di Aquaviva

Citations

  1. [S235] Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, online google.com, Richard Borthwick, 22 Jul 2000.

Campli Seigneur d' Arce

M, b. circa 1200
     Campli Seigneur d' Arce was born circa 1200 at Italy.

Child of Campli Seigneur d' Arce